Bound To Stay Bound

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 Mister Max : the book of lost things
 Author: Voigt, Cynthia

 Illustrator: Bruno, Iacopo

 Publisher:  Knopf
 Pub Year: 2013

 Classification: Fiction
 Physical Description: 367 p., ill., map, 20 cm.

 BTSB No: 911335 ISBN: 9780307976819
 Ages: 8-12 Grades: 3-7

 Subjects:
 Self-reliance -- Fiction
 Problem solving -- Fiction

Courtesy of Random Audio

Price: $19.81

Summary:
When Max's parents leave the country without him, he must rely on his wits to get by, and before long he is running his own--rather unusual--business.

Series:
Mister Max


Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: MG
   Reading Level: 5.80
   Points: 14.0   Quiz: 161403
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: 3-5
   Reading Level: 5.70
   Points: 21.0   Quiz: 61720

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (+) (05/15/13)
   School Library Journal (07/01/13)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (00/10/13)
 The Hornbook (00/09/13)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 07/01/2013 Gr 5–8—Admirers of Voigt's "Tillerman" series (S & S) will recognize several plot points in this first volume of a proposed trilogy: a child is seemingly deserted by his parents and survives with the support of his grandmother. But there the similarities end, for this is a mystery-cum-adventure story with a 19th-century feel and an accumulation of improbabilities that build to a satisfyingly melodramatic climax. As Maximilian Starling wends his way around his nameless city trying to find an honest day's work, he stumbles across a series of people with problems, unanswered questions, unsatisfied longings, or vague states of malaise. And then there are the sinister types who seem intent on breaking into Max's house. What are they looking for? Fortunately, Max's parents were theatricals, which gives him both an intimate knowledge of roles to assume while pretending to be old enough for employment and an ample supply of costumes in which to disguise himself. Whether it's finding a good home for a lost dog, facilitating the reunion of disappointed lovers, or recovering a long-lost heirloom, Max displays good sense, a sensitive nature, and winning ingenuity. He resists being labeled a detective and since he merely guides people toward the resolution of their troubles, it's fitting that he calls himself a "solutioneer." By book's end, however, he has not answered his own questions. Readers still don't know what has happened to his parents, for example. This will likely leave them strangely contented, knowing that Voigt has so much more to reveal in the sequels to this comedic page-turner.—Miriam Lang Budin, Chappaqua Library, NY - Copyright 2013 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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