Bound To Stay Bound

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 Copper sun
 Author: Draper, Sharon M.


 Publisher:  Atheneum Books for Young Readers
 Pub Year: 2006

 Classification: Fiction
 Physical Description: 302 p.,  24 cm.

 BTSB No: 290495 ISBN: 9780689821813
 Ages: 14-18 Grades: 9-12

 Subjects:
 Slavery -- Fiction
 Contract labor -- Fiction
 South Carolina -- History -- 1600-1775, Colonial period -- Fiction
 Florida -- History -- Fiction

Price: $20.51

Summary:
Two girls--one a slave and the other an indentured servant--escape their Carolina plantation and try to make their way to Fort Moses, Florida, a Spanish colony that gives sanctuary to slaves.

Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: UG
   Reading Level: 5.20
   Points: 11.0   Quiz: 104029
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: 9-12
   Reading Level: 4.80
   Points: 18.0   Quiz: 39127

Awards:
 Coretta Scott King Author Award, 2007

Common Core Standards 
   Grade 8 → Reading → RL Literature → 8.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 7 → Reading → CCR College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (01/01/06)
   School Library Journal (+) (01/06)
   Booklist (+) (02/01/06)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (04/06)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 01/01/2006 Gr 8 Up-This action-packed, multifaceted, character-rich story describes the shocking realities of the slave trade and plantation life while portraying the perseverance, resourcefulness, and triumph of the human spirit. Amari is a 15-year-old Ashanti girl who is happily anticipating her marriage to Besa. Then, slavers arrive in her village, slaughter her family, and shatter her world. Shackled, frightened, and despondent, she is led to the Cape Coast where she is branded and forced onto a "boat of death" for the infamous Middle Passage to the Carolinas. There, Percival Derby buys her as a gift for his son's 16th birthday. Trust and friendship develop between Amari and Polly, a white indentured servant, and when their mistress gives birth to a black baby, the teens try to cover up Mrs. Derby's transgression. However, Mr. Derby's brutal fury spurs them to escape toward the rumored freedom of Fort Mose, a Spanish colony in Florida. Although the narrative focuses alternately on Amari and Polly, the story is primarily Amari's, and her pain, hope, and determination are acute. Cruel white stereotypes abound except for the plantation's mistress, whose love is colorblind; the doctor who provides the ruse for the girls' escape; and the Irish woman who gives the fugitives a horse and wagon. As readers embrace Amari and Polly, they will better understand the impact of human exploitation and suffering throughout history. In addition, they will gain a deeper knowledge of slavery, indentured servitude, and 18th-century sanctuaries for runaway slaves.-Gerry Larson, Durham School of the Arts, NC Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information. - Copyright 2006 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

Booklist - 02/01/2006 *Starred Review* Best known for her contemporary African American characters, Draper's latest novel is a searing work of historical fiction that imagines a 15-year-old African girl's journey through American slavery. The story begins in Amari's Ashanti village, but the idyllic scene explodes in bloodshed when slavers arrive and murder her family. Amari and her beloved, Besa, are shackled, and so begins the account of impossible horrors from the slave fort, the Middle Passage, and auction on American shores, where a rice plantation owner buys Amari for his 16-year-old son's sexual enjoyment. In brutal specifics, Draper shows the inhumanity: Amari is systematically raped on the slave ship and on the plantation and a slave child is used as alligator bait by white teenagers. And she adds to the complex history in alternating chapters that flip between Amari and Polly, an indentured white servant on Amari's plantation. A few plot elements, such as Amari's chance meeting with Besa, are contrived. But Draper builds the explosive tension to the last chapter, and the sheer power of the story, balanced between the overwhelmingly brutal facts of slavery and Amari's ferocious survivor's spirit, will leave readers breathless, even as they consider the story's larger questions about the infinite costs of slavery and how to reconcile history. A moving author's note discusses the real places and events on which the story is based. Give this to teens who have read Julius Lester's Day of Tears (2005). - Copyright 2006 Booklist.

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