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 Pyramids
 Author: Furstinger, Nancy


 Publisher:  Child's World
 Pub Year: 2014

 Dewey: 516
 Classification: Nonfiction
 Physical Description: 24 p., col. ill., 21 x 24 cm.

 BTSB No: 362067 ISBN: 9781623239855
 Ages: 6-8 Grades: 1-3

 Subjects:
 Shapes
 Pyramids

Price: $6.50

Summary:
Explores the geometry of pyramids using real-world examples such as grocery store displays and the Great Pyramids in Egypt.

Series:
3-D Shapes (Child's World)


Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: LG
   Reading Level: 4.10
   Points: .5   Quiz: 164836

Common Core Standards 
   Grade 2 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 2.RI Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 2 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 2.RI Craft & Structure
   Grade 2 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 2.RI Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 2 → Reading → RI Informational Text → Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, & Rang
   Grade 2 → Reading → CCR College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards fo
   Grade 3 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 3.RI Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 3 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 3.RI Craft & Structure
   Grade 3 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 3.RI Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 3 → Reading → RI Informational Text → Texts Illustrating Complexity, Quality, & Range of
   Grade 3 → Reading → CCR College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards fo

Reviews:
   School Library Journal (-) (04/01/14)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 04/01/2014 Gr 2–4—Though neatly designed and kitted out with big, bright color photos, these simplistic introductions to solid shapes are likely to sow more confusion than enlightenment. Along with factual errors (no, grave goods were not discovered inside the thoroughly looted Egyptian pyramids, and beach umbrellas are seldom if ever "shaped like a pyramid"), these definitions fail to mention that objects in nature only approximate ideal shapes. As a result, for "How many types of fruit that are spheres can you count in this picture?" the truly accurate answer, using the given definition, would be "none." Also, the author notes that cubes are a type of prism only in Prisms, not Cubes. Furthermore, the illustrations don't always measure up—graphic representations of a prism and a pyramid are drawn in a bewildering, semi-transparent way, and the activities in the back matter are often less than thrilling (Pyramids features an invitation to glue pennies to a pyramid shaped piece of Styrofoam). - Copyright 2014 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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