Bound To Stay Bound

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 Dave the potter : artist, poet, slave
 Author: Hill, Laban Carrick

 Illustrator: Collier, Bryan

 Publisher:  Little, Brown
 Pub Year: 2010

 Dewey: 738.092
 Classification: Biography
 Physical Description: [40] p. (1 folded), col. ill., 22 x 28 cm.

 BTSB No: 444361 ISBN: 9780316107310
 Ages: 3-6 Grades: K-1

 Subjects:
 Dave, -- fl. 1834-1864
 Potters
 African Americans -- Biography
 American poets
 Slaves

Price: $6.50

Summary:
A true story about a slave with an extraordinary talent for pottery and poetry.

Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: LG
   Reading Level: 6.00
   Points: .5   Quiz: 139661
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: K-2
   Reading Level: 9.40
   Points: 1.0   Quiz: 51287

Awards:
 Caldecott Honor, 2011
Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award, 2011

Common Core Standards 
   Grade K → Reading → RL Literature → Caldecott Honor Books
   CC Maps Recommended Works Gde K-5
   Grade K → Reading → RI Informational Text → K.RI Key Ideas & Details
   Grade K → Reading → RI Informational Text → K.RI Craft & Structure
   Grade K → Reading → RI Informational Text → K.RI Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade K → Reading → RI Informational Text → K.RI Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade K → Reading → RI Informational Text → Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, & Rang
   Grade 1 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 1.RL Craft & Structure
   Grade 1 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 1.RI Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 1 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 1.RI Craft & Structure
   Grade 1 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 1.RI Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade 1 → Reading → RI Informational Text → Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, & Rang
   Grade 1 → Reading → CCR - College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards
   Grade 1 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 1.RI Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (08/15/10)
   School Library Journal (08/01/10)
   Booklist (11/01/10)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 08/01/2010 K-Gr 4—The life of an astonishingly prolific and skilled potter who lived and died a slave in 19th-century South Carolina is related in simple, powerful sentences that outline the making of a pot. The movements of Dave's hands are described using familiar, solid verbs: pulling, pinching, squeezing, pounding. Rural imagery—a robin's puffed breast, a carnival wheel—remind readers of Dave's surroundings. The pithy lines themselves recall the short poems that Dave inscribed on his pots. Collier's earth-toned watercolor and collage art extends the story, showing the landscape, materials, and architecture of a South Carolina farm. Alert readers will find hidden messages in some of the collages, but what stands out in these pictures are Dave's hands and eyes, and the strength of his body, reflected in the shape and size of his legendary jars and pots. A lengthy author's note fleshes out what is known of the man's life story and reproduces several of his two-line poems. A photograph of some of Dave's surviving works cements the book's link to the present and lists of print and online resources encourage further exploration. An inspiring story, perfectly presented and sure to prompt classroom discussion and projects. Outstanding in every way.—Paula Willey, Baltimore County Public Library, Towson, MD - Copyright 2010 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

Booklist - 11/01/2010 As a closing essay explains, little is known about the man known as Dave the potter. Two things are certain, though: he was a slave in South Carolina, and he was a potter of uncommon skill. As Hill writes, “Dave was one of only two potters at the time who could successfully make pots that were larger than twenty gallons.” He also inscribed strange, sophisticated poetry into the clay: “I wonder where / is all my relation / friendship to all— / and, every nation.” The verses Hill uses to introduce us to Dave are sometimes just as evocative: “On wet days, / heavy with rainwater, / it is cool and squishy, / mud pie heaven.” The book’s quiet dignity comes from its refusal to scrutinize life as a slave; instead, it is nearly a procedural, following Dave’s mixing, kneading, spinning, shaping, and glazing. Collier’s gorgeous watercolor-and-collage illustrations recall the work of E. B. Lewis—earth-toned, infused with pride, and always catching his subjects in the most telling of poses. A beautiful introduction to a great lost artist. - Copyright 2010 Booklist.

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