Bound To Stay Bound

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 Sunny side up
 Author: Holm, Jennifer L.

 Illustrator: Holm, Matthew
Pien, Lark

 Publisher:  Scholastic
 Pub Year: 2015

 Dewey: 741.5
 Classification: Nonfiction
 Physical Description: 216 p., col. ill., 21 cm.

 BTSB No: 460074 ISBN: 9780545741651
 Ages: 8-12 Grades: 3-7

 Subjects:
 Family life -- Fiction
 Friendship -- Fiction
 Summer -- Fiction
 Florida -- Fiction

Price: $17.01

Summary:
Sunny Lewin has been sent to Florida to stay with her grandfather for the summer. At first she thought Florida would be fun--it is the home of Disney World, after all. But the place where Gramps lives is full of old people. Luckily, she meets Buzz, a boy completely obsessed with comic books and they have adventures of their own. But Sunny will soon find out a family secret explaining why she was sent to Florida in the first place.

Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: MG
   Reading Level: 2.40
   Points: .5   Quiz: 175718
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: 6-8
   Reading Level: 3.60
   Points: 3.0   Quiz: 66648

Common Core Standards 
   Grade 5 → Reading → RL Literature → 5.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 5 → Reading → RL Literature → 5.RL Integration & Knowledge of Ideas

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (+) (07/01/15)
   School Library Journal (+) (08/01/15)
   Booklist (08/01/15)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (00/10/15)
 The Hornbook (+) (00/09/15)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 08/01/2015 Gr 4–6—The Holm siblings, of "Babymouse" and "Squish" (both Random) fame, and colorist Pien, of American Born Chinese fame (First Second, 2008), have created a must-have graphic novel based on true events from the Holms' childhood. The year is 1976, and Sunny Lewin will be spending the summer with her grandfather in Florida. Artistic details in the panels, such as the style of the clothes and the cars, give readers a good sense of the time period. Sunny arrives in Florida feeling hopeful that it will be an exciting summer, but her enthusiasm quickly fades when she realizes that she has to sleep on a squeaky sofa bed and her grandfather is too busy dragging her on boring errands to take her to Disney World. Sunny's days start to look up when she befriends a boy from the neighborhood; together, they read superhero comic books and find lost golf balls and missing cats for reward money. Overshadowing Sunny's summertime adventures are events from the past year that have led to her last-minute Florida trip. She loves her older brother, but when he takes drugs, he makes poor choices and unintentionally hurts her. Sunny feels confused and responsible for her brother's erratic behavior. This title sensitively portrays how drug abuse affects loved ones through visual imagery and realistic dialogue. VERDICT A humorous yet emotional story with a memorable protagonist and detailed full-color art that make this a perfect choice for fans of Raina Telgemeier.—Marissa Lieberman, East Orange Public Library, NJ - Copyright 2015 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

Booklist - 08/01/2015 In August of 1976, 10-year-old Sunny’s parents send her to Florida to visit Gramps. Unfortunately, staying with Gramps means a creaky hide-a-bed, early dinners, and, well, tons of old people. Soon Sunny meets Buzz, whose dad works at Gramps’ retirement resort, and thank goodness! Buzz introduces Sunny to Swamp Thing, Spiderman, and Batman, and a whole universe opens. The two wile away hours at the comics shop, find senior residents’ lost cats, and get chased by a local alligator—all in a summer day’s work. Woven into the Florida frolic though, through dated flashback images, is the real reason for Sunny’s last-minute visit: her older brother is struggling with addiction, and Sunny thinks she got him in trouble. Though Sunny will appeal to all kinds of readers, an authors’ note shares the Holms’ hope to let kids in similar situations know that it’s OK to feel sad and to talk about it. Clear dialogue bubbles, plenty of wordless spreads, and Matthew’s cartoons and beach-umbrella color palette keep Sunny’s story an upbeat one that readers will easily stick with. - Copyright 2015 Booklist.

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