Bound To Stay Bound

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 Zeus and the thunderbolt of doom (Heroes in training)
 Author: Holub, Joan

 Publisher:  Aladdin (2012)

 Classification: Fiction
 Physical Description: 100 p., ill., 21 cm.

 BTSB No: 461302 ISBN: 9781442457874
 Ages: 7-10 Grades: 2-5

 Subjects:
 Zeus -- (Greek deity) -- Fiction
 Adventure fiction
 Greek mythology -- Fiction

Price: $22.28

Summary:
#1 of the series: After pulling a magical thunderbolt from a stone, ten-year-old Zeus goes on the adventure of a lifetime.

 Added Entry - Personal Name: Williams, Suzanne
 Illustrator: Phillips, Craig
Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: LG
   Reading Level: 3.80
   Points: 2.0   Quiz: 153200
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: 3-5
   Reading Level: 3.30
   Points: 5.0   Quiz: 57446

Common Core Standards 
   Grade 3 → Reading → RL Literature → 3.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 3 → Reading → RL Literature → 3.RL Craft & Structure
   Grade 3 → Reading → RL Literature → 3.RL Integration & Knowledge of Ideas

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (05/15/12)
   School Library Journal (10/01/12)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 10/01/2012 Gr 2–4—This funny chapter book retells the story of Zeus, Cronus, and the Olympians. Many kids will already be familiar with Cronus, King of the Titans, who swallows his children so that they might never steal his throne. Zeus, the youngest of the Olympians, is smuggled out to a mountaintop sanctuary, and it is from this haven that he is kidnapped by some hungry, none-too-bright giants. Along their journey to Cronus, Zeus, who has always heard voices foretelling some great destiny, is helped by a number of mythological creatures. The voices and some strange clues he finds along the way lead him to think that the Olympians trapped inside Cronus are the key to his survival, even though he doesn't know the truth about who they are. This is a fun read, casting Zeus in the role of relatable kid, and there is a nice balance between his primary goal of survival and his sense of destiny and adventure. Drawings throughout illustrate particularly dramatic scenes, but for the most part, Zeus and his world are left to readers' imaginations. The story ends with him freeing the Olympians, who he is surprised to find are kids like himself. He agrees to travel with these new friends to find the rest of the Olympians, setting up the future of the series nicely. Share this title, and likely more to come, with those still too young for Percy Jackson's adventures.—Heather Talty, formerly at Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School, New York City - Copyright 2012 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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