Bound To Stay Bound

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 Paper son : Lee's journey to America
 Author: James, Helen Foster

 Added Entry - Personal Name: Loh, Virginia Shin-Mui
 Illustrator: Ong, Wilson

 Publisher:  Sleeping Bear Press
 Pub Year: 2013

 Classification: Fiction
 Physical Description: [40] p., col. ill., 28 cm.

 BTSB No: 487570 ISBN: 9781585368334
 Ages: 6-9 Grades: 1-4

 Subjects:
 Angel Island Immigration Station (Calif.) -- Fiction
 Immigration and emigration -- Fiction
 Immigrants -- Fiction
 Chinese Americans -- Fiction
 Orphans -- Fiction
 Angel Island (Calif.) -- History -- 20th century -- Fiction

Price: $20.01

Summary:
Twelve-year-old Lee, an orphan, reluctantly leaves his grandparents in China for the long sea voyage to San Francisco, where he and other immigrants undergo examinations at Angel Island Immigration Station.

Series:
Tales Of Young Americans Series


Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: LG
   Reading Level: 3.60
   Points: .5   Quiz: 158656
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: K-2
   Reading Level: 1.60
   Points: 2.0   Quiz: 61772

Common Core Standards 
   Grade 2 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 2.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 2 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 2.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity

Reviews:
   Booklist (+) (06/01/13)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 04/20/2013 Gr 1–4—Lee, 12, lives with his grandparents. His parents have died, but it was their wish that he go to America for better opportunities. In 1926, conditions are difficult in China, and the boy's loving grandparents sadly agree that leaving would be the best thing for him. Immigration laws restrict Chinese people from entering the United States, so Lee's family purchased a "paper son" slot for him. A Chinese man already living in America will say that Lee is his son to get him into the country. As Wang Lee becomes Fu Lee, he must learn minute details about his new family in order to pass the interrogations at the Angel Island Immigration Station. While often called the "Ellis Island" of the west, Angel Island was often about stopping immigrants rather than welcoming them. People could spend weeks, months, or even years there, waiting to pass the tests or appealing deportation rulings. Since being a "paper son" was illegal, secrecy was paramount. The story concentrates on Lee's feelings about traveling alone to America, staying on Angel Island, and navigating the questioning. Failure would mean deportation, giving up the chance to help his grandparents, and losing the money his family paid. Large-scale illustrations, full-page and two-page bleeds, realistically portray the time and place and will help young readers with context. The authors provide a helpful summary of Angel Island history. Use with Milly Lee's Landed (Farrar, 2006) and Laurence Yep's Dragon Child (HarperCollins, 2008) to give young readers a fascinating glimpse into this elusive chapter of American history.—Lucinda Snyder Whitehurst, St. Christopher's School, Richmond, VA - Copyright 2013 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

Booklist - 06/01/2013 *Starred Review* Twelve-year-old Lee does not want to leave China. Yet the responsibility for supporting his grandparents weighs heavily on his heart. He is to be a “paper son,” and he studies a coaching book that details the life he supposedly lives with his American father so he can dupe immigration officials in California. After tense good-byes, Lee is off across the Pacific in 1926, only to be detained on Angel Island (“the Ellis Island of the West”) with other Asian immigrants. They are treated like prisoners and fear deportation, but Lee knows that he must prove that he belongs with the family listed on his documents and is more than just their son on paper. In this poignant tale of home and heartbreak, which recalls Allen Say’s Grandfather’s Journey (1993), readers learn about the emotional toll that is part of so many immigration experiences. Ong’s light-infused paintings match the narrative’s subdued tone, and Lee’s dignity is evident in his upright posture as he bravely faces a new life in a foreign place. It’s not a story often told for this age, and readers will be drawn to Lee’s quiet determination as he grapples with the complexity of knowing that “I didn’t want to come, but now I need to stay.” - Copyright 2013 Booklist.

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