Bound To Stay Bound

View MARC Record
To save an image, right click the thumbnail and choose "Save target as..." or "Save link as..."
 M is for monster : a fantastic creatures alphabet
 Author: Lewis, J. Patrick

 Illustrator: Kelley, Gerald

 Publisher:  Sleeping Bear Press
 Pub Year: 2014

 Dewey: 001.944
 Classification: Nonfiction
 Physical Description: [32] p., col. ill., 26 x 28 cm.

 BTSB No: 568453 ISBN: 9781585368181
 Ages: 6-10 Grades: 1-5

 Subjects:
 Monsters
 Alphabet

Price: $20.01

Summary:
Meet the fascinating main characters featured in many myths and legends in this alphabetical tribute to those things that lurk in the shadows, go bump in the night, and thrill us to our bones.

Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: MG
   Reading Level: 7.00
   Points: 1.0   Quiz: 177439

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (08/01/14)
   School Library Journal (08/01/14)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 08/01/2014 K-Gr 3—Lewis takes on a perennial favorite with his latest, a sort of monster bestiary exploring various creatures, from mythology, legend and fairy tales. Readers will find a monster for each letter of the alphabet, as well as a description, a poem, and an attractive illustration. The painterly, surreal images include details children will enjoy, such as the Loch Ness monster sneaking up behind a man in a boat, or a nervous-looking gargoyle with a mouse perched atop its head. Among the chosen creatures are the phoenix, the kraken, Baba Yaga, and, of course, the dragon. Some entries seem sketchy at first ("F for Frankenstein" refers to the monster as Frankenstein, before explaining that the name is truly that of the scientist who created him) but quickly pull together the origin of the monster's story, well-known features, and ties to modern lore. The ogre description, for example, describes the creatures as "extremely dangerous, humanoid looking monsters that prowl woodlands in search of humans to eat," states that they were probably created by author Charles Perrault, and says that the best-known modern example of an ogre is probably Shrek.—Heather Talty, formerly at Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School, New York City - Copyright 2014 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

View MARC Record
Loading...