Bound To Stay Bound

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 I wanna new room
 Author: Orloff, Karen Kaufman

 Illustrator: Catrow, David

 Publisher:  Putnam
 Pub Year: 2011

 Classification: Easy
 Physical Description: [32] p., col. ill., 22 x 27 cm.

 BTSB No: 691550 ISBN: 9780399254055
 Ages: 5-8 Grades: K-3

 Subjects:
 Letter writing -- Fiction
 Brothers -- Fiction
 Infants -- Fiction
 Sharing -- Fiction
 Humorous fiction

Price: $19.81

Summary:
Through brief letters to his parents, Alex presents reasons why he should not have to share a room with his younger brother.

Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: LG
   Reading Level: 2.70
   Points: .5   Quiz: 141707

Common Core Standards 
   Grade K → Reading → RL Literature → K.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade K → Reading → RL Literature → K.RL Craft & Structure
   Grade K → Reading → RL Literature → K.RL Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade 1 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 1.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 1 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 1.RL Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade 1 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 1.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 2 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 2.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 2 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 2.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 2 → Reading → CCR College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards fo

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (08/15/10)
   School Library Journal (12/01/10)
   Booklist (10/15/10)

Full Text Reviews:

Booklist - 10/15/2010 As in I Wanna Iguana (2004), this story about a child tired of sharing a room with his pesky little brother is told through letters and illustrated in energetic, cartoon-style illustrations. Alex pleads for his own room and complains about his little brother Ethan—“He sticks crayons up his nose and barks like a walrus”—while a fantastical double-page image shows Ethan as a walrus in action. Finally, Dad builds Alex a tree house, but once he is alone in his new space, Alex misses all the family chaos. The slapstick, sibling anger, and crowding issues are all spot-on. - Copyright 2010 Booklist.

School Library Journal - 12/01/2010 K-Gr 3—In this companion to I Wanna Iguana (Putnam, 2004), irrepressible Alex is back with a new entreaty—his own room, puh-leez—played out in another series of letter exchanges. Now sharing a room with his younger brother in the wake of his sister's birth, Alex delivers his first written plea to Mom, who, in the depths of postpartum exhaustion, refers him to his father. Thus do Alex and his good-natured dad begin their own guy-to-guy letter exchange, with Alex detailing Ethan's various transgressions ("He sticks crayons up his nose and barks like a walrus!") and his reasonable father reminding him that he was no different at the age of four. Back and forth go Alex's complaints and his father's practical rejoinders until Dad suggests that they build a tree house together, where surely Alex can find some peace and quiet. Indeed, it's too quiet—and Alex's final letter is to Ethan, inviting him to play in his new retreat. The last page shows the brothers happily ascending the tree-house ladder together. As spun out in the exchanges, the child vs. parent points of view and the sibling rivalry all ring hilariously true. Catrow's zany pencil and watercolor illustrations capture perfectly the madcap daydreams in Alex's head as well as the familiar detritus of a young boy's room. (The iguana still lives there!) A surefire kid-pleaser with a subtle, sweet lesson in peaceful coexistence.—Kathleen Finn, St. Francis Xavier School, Winooski, VT - Copyright 2010 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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