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 Ben Franklin's big splash : the mostly true story of his first invention
 Author: Rosenstock, Barb

 Illustrator: Schindler, S. D.

 Publisher:  Calkins Creek
 Pub Year: 2014

 Classification: Easy
 Physical Description: [32] p., col. ill., 27 cm.

 BTSB No: 765080 ISBN: 9781620914465
 Ages: 6-8 Grades: 1-3

 Subjects:
 Franklin, Benjamin, -- 1706-1790 -- Childhood and youth -- Fiction
 Inventors -- Fiction

Price: $19.99

Summary:
An account of young Ben's earliest invention--swimming paddles.

Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: LG
   Reading Level: 4.40
   Points: .5   Quiz: 167380
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: K-2
   Reading Level: 9.60
   Points: 1.0   Quiz: 64077

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (+) (05/15/14)
   School Library Journal (07/01/14)
   Booklist (09/01/14)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (00/10/14)
 The Hornbook (00/09/14)

Full Text Reviews:

Booklist - 09/01/2014 Statesman and inventor Benjamin Franklin got an early start on the creative portion of his résumé. As an 11-year-old swimming fan, he was not content to idly paddle Boston’s Charles River. Instead, he pondered important questions such as, “Why can’t I swim like a fish?” which led him to his first inventions: swim fins and sandals. Basing her account on an excerpt from a letter Franklin sent to a fellow scientist in 1773, Rosenstock fictionalizes somewhat in describing how Franklin constructed these wooden swim aids. She also spotlights his curiosity and emphasizes the steps of the scientific method (problem, research, hypothesis, test, analyze, conclude) in describing Franklin’s thought processes. Schindler’s ink-and-­watercolor illustrations pick up the comical nuances of the text (especially Rosenstock’s penchant for vivid alliterative verbs) and convey the imagination required for invention. Appended with a list of Franklin’s inventions, source notes, and time line. Pair with Gloria Whelan’s Queen Victoria’s Bathing Machine (2014) for another inventive historical swimming story. - Copyright 2014 Booklist.

School Library Journal - 07/01/2014 K-Gr 3—Before he was an inventor, before he was a statesman, before he was a printer, Franklin was a young son of a soapmaker with big ideas and a penchant for swimming in the Charles River of Boston. This made him a bit of an odd duck at the time, as many people of the 18th century believed swimming could make them sick. With this "mostly true story," Rosenstock shares how even as a boy, Franklin possessed a powerful curiosity and a can-do attitude that led him to create swim paddles for his feet and hands that would help him move faster and better, much like the fish he observed in the river. The alliterative, sibilant text is a rollicking read to share aloud with young students ("where he slid off his stinky shoes, stripped off his sweaty stockings, squirmed out of his sticky shirt, shed his steamy breeches, and splashed in"). There is plenty of emphasis on words and phrases that are highlighted by colorful and distinct typefaces, some sliding down the page or shaped like a watery wave. The watercolor and ink artwork conveys joy and motion, with young Ben splashing into the water, gleefully trying out his fins. An extensive bibliography, source notes for quotations, and a time line of Franklin's life add to the veracity and strength of this story. This is a fun introduction to one of the nation's founding fathers and a solid addition to collections needing a different perspective on this American icon.—Jody Kopple, Shady Hill School, Cambridge, MA - Copyright 2014 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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