Bound To Stay Bound

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 Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
 Author: Rowling, J. K.

 Illustrator: GrandPre, Mary

 Publisher:  Scholastic
 Pub Year: 2003

 Classification: Fiction
 Physical Description: xi, 870 p., ill., 24 cm.

 BTSB No: 769137 ISBN: 9780439358064
 Ages: 8-14 Grades: 3-9

 Subjects:
 Wizards -- Fiction
 Magic -- Fiction
 School stories
 Bildungsromans
 England -- Fiction

Courtesy of Random House Audio

Price: $29.11

Summary:
During his fifth year at Hogwarts, Harry finds depth and strength in his friends, boundless loyalty, and unbearable sacrifice.

Series:
Harry Potter, #5


Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: MG
   Reading Level: 7.20
   Points: 44.0   Quiz: 69785
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: 6-8
   Reading Level: 5.90
   Points: 49.0   Quiz: 33730

Common Core Standards 
   Grade 3 → Reading → RL Literature → 3.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 3 → Reading → RL Literature → 3.RL Integration & Knowledge of Ideas
   Grade 3 → Reading → RF Foundational Skills → 3.RF Fluency
   Grade 4 → Reading → RF Foundational Skills → 4.RF Fluency
   Grade 5 → Reading → RF Foundational Skills → 5.RF Fluency
   Grade 5 → Reading → RL Literature → 5.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 5 → Reading → RL Literature → 5.RL Integration & Knowledge of Ideas
   Grade 5 → Reading → RL Literature → Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, & Rang
   Grade 6 → Reading → RL Literature → 6.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 6 → Reading → RL Literature → 6.RL Craft & Structure
   Grade 6 → Reading → RL Literature → 6.RL Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade 6 → Reading → RL Literature → 6.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 6 → Reading → CCR College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards fo
   Grade 7 → Reading → RL Literature → 7.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 7 → Reading → RL Literature → 7.RL Range of Reading & LEvel of Text Complexity
   Grade 8 → Reading → RL Literature → 8.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 8 → Reading → RL Literature → 8.RL Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade 8 → Reading → RL Literature → 8.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 5 → Reading → RL Literature → 5.RL Craft & Structure

Reviews:
   School Library Journal (08/03)
   Booklist (+) (07/01/03)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (09/03)
 The Hornbook (09/03)

Full Text Reviews:

Bulletin for the Center... - 09/01/2003 Harry Potter’s latest adventure reveals an admirable hero somewhat the worse for wear: his grief at the death of Cedric, his fear of (and connection to) the evil Lord Voldemort, and his emotional distance from Professor Dumbledore combine to make Harry a bit short-tempered, a bit short-sighted, and a bit more recognizably human. Rowling eases readers back into Harry’s world—and Harry’s precarious existence—with nary a ripple: the suburban peace of the Dursleys’ manicured lives is shattered by the intrusion of dementors, sent by a rogue in the Ministry of Magic and seeking to do Harry serious injury. A wizard rescue party retrieves Harry from the world of Muggles and sets him down amidst the Order of the Phoenix, a secret society that plots Voldemort’s final downfall. With an escalating love life, academic complications at school, and a Ministry of Magic determined to ignore the obvious, Harry is in an adolescent uproar. Revelations about Sirius Black, Professor Snape, and Harry’s late father cause the boy to question all he holds true, and his confusion clouds his judgment. A roaring set of practical jokes by Fred and George Weasley against a politically appointed, obnoxious new professor at Hogwarts lightens the tone just in time for the Order’s tragic confrontation with Voldemort and his malevolent minions. Rowling cheerfully turns her own conventions on their ears, and the result is a surprising and enjoyable ride. While Harry’s much-touted love interest fizzles before it fires, familiar characters achieve a bit more depth: Ginny Weasley starts to come into her own, Hermione employs a dryly wicked wit, and Dumbledore reveals, if not feet, at least a little toe of clay. It’s no longer quite clear that all will work out in the end; the lines are being drawn, but, as exemplified by Percy Weasley, not everyone is on the right side. Rowling has managed to make Harry and his fate a bit less predictable, which, in the fifth of a seven-volume series, is a very good thing. - Copyright 2003 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.

School Library Journal - 08/01/2003 Gr 4 Up-Harry has just returned to Hogwarts after a lonely summer. Dumbledore is uncommunicative and most of the students seem to think Harry is either conceited or crazy for insisting that Voldemort is back and as evil as ever. Angry, scared, and unable to confide in his godfather, Sirius, the teen wizard lashes out at his friends and enemies alike. The head of the Ministry of Magic is determined to discredit Dumbledore and undermine his leadership of Hogwarts, and he appoints nasty, pink-cardigan-clad Professor Umbridge as the new Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher and High Inquisitor of the school, bringing misery upon staff and students alike. This bureaucratic nightmare, added to Harry's certain knowledge that Voldemort is becoming more powerful, creates a desperate, Kafkaesque feeling during Harry's fifth year at Hogwarts. The adults all seem evil, misguided, or simply powerless, so the students must take matters into their own hands. Harry's confusion about his godfather and father, and his apparent rejection by Dumbledore make him question his own motives and the condition of his soul. Also, Harry is now 15, and the hormones are beginning to kick in. There are a lot of secret doings, a little romance, and very little Quidditch or Hagrid (more reasons for Harry's gloom), but the power of this book comes from the young magician's struggles with his emotions and identity. Particularly moving is the unveiling, after a final devastating tragedy, of Dumbledore's very strong feelings of attachment and responsibility toward Harry. Children will enjoy the magic and the Hogwarts mystique, and young adult readers will find a rich and compelling coming-of-age story as well.-Eva Mitnick, Los Angeles Public Library Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information. - Copyright 2003 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

Booklist - 07/01/2003 *Starred Review* No, you can’t put it down, but believe me, you’ll wish you could. This is not an easy book to lug around. Its worldwide hype aside, the fifth installment in Harry Potter’s saga should be judged on the usual factors: plot, characters, and the quality of the writing. So how does it fare? One thing emerges quickly: Rowling has not lost her flair as a storyteller or her ability to keep coming up with new gimcracks to astound her readers. But her true skills lie in the way she ages Harry, successfully evolving him from the once downtrodden yet hopeful young boy to this new, gangly teenager showing all the symptoms of adolescence--he is sullen, rude, and contemptuous of adult behavior, especially hypocrisy. This last symptom of the maturing Harry fits especially well into the plot, which finds almost all of the grown-ups in the young wizard’s life saying one thing and doing another, especially those at the Ministry of Magic, who discredit Harry in the media to convince the citizenry that Voldemort is not alive. Rowling effectively uses this plot strand as a way of introducing a kind of subtext in which she takes on such issues as governmental lying and the politics of personal destruction, but she makes her points in ways that will be clearly understood by young readers. To fight for truth and justice--and to protect Harry--the Order of the Phoenix has been reconstituted, but young Potter finds squabbling and hypocrisy among even this august group. And in a stunning and bold move, Rowling also allows Harry (and readers) to view an incident from the life of a teenage James Potter that shows him to be an insensitive bully, smashing the iconic view Harry has always had of his father. Are there problems with the book? Sure. Even though children, especially, won’t protest, it could be shorter, particularly since Rowling is repetitious with descriptions (Harry is always “angry”; ultimate bureaucrat Doris Umbridge always looks like a toad). But these are quibbles about a rich, worthy effort that meets the very high expectations of a world of readers. - Copyright 2003 Booklist.

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