Bound To Stay Bound

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 True story of the 3 little pigs
 Author: Scieszka, Jon

 Illustrator: Smith, Lane

 Publisher:  Puffin Books
 Pub Year: 1996

 Classification: Easy
 Physical Description: [32] p., col. ill., 27 cm.

 BTSB No: 792295 ISBN: 9780670827596
 Ages: 3-8 Grades: K-3

 Subjects:
 Wolves -- Fiction
 Pigs -- Fiction
 Fractured fairy tales

Price: $14.26

Summary:
The wolf gives his own outlandish version of what really happened when he tangled with the three little pigs.

Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: LG
   Reading Level: 3.00
   Points: .5   Quiz: 9506
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: K-2
   Reading Level: 2.50
   Points: 2.0   Quiz: 11850

Common Core Standards 
   Grade K → Reading → RL Literature → Read Alouds
   CC Maps Recommended Works Gde K-5
   Grade K → Reading → RL Literature → K.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade K → Reading → RL Literature → K.RL Craft & Structure
   Grade K → Reading → RL Literature → K.RL Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade 1 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 1.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 1 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 1.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 2 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 2.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 2 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 2.RL Craft & Structure
   Grade 2 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 2.RL Integration & Knowledge of Ideas
   Grade 2 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 2.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 2 → Reading → CCR College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards fo

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews
   School Library Journal
   Booklist
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (+)
 The Hornbook

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 10/01/1989 Gr 1 Up--Victim for centuries of a bad press, Alexander (``You can call me Al'') T. Wolf steps forward at last to give his side of the story. Trying to borrow a cup of sugar to make a cake for his dear old Granny, Al calls on his neighbors--and can he help it if two of them built such shoddy houses? A couple of sneezes, a couple of dead pigs amidst the wreckage and, well, it would be shame to let those ham dinners spoil, wouldn't it? And when the pig in the brick house makes a nasty comment about Granny, isn't it only natural to get a little steamed? It's those reporters from the Daily Pig that made Al out to be Big and Bad, that caused him to be arrested and sent to the (wait for it) Pig Pen. ``I was framed,'' he concludes mournfully. Smith's dark tones and sometimes shadowy, indistinct shapes recall the distinctive illustrations he did for Merriam's Halloween ABC (Macmillan, 1987); the bespectacled wolf moves with a rather sinister bonelessness, and his juicy sneezes tear like thunderbolts through a dim, grainy world. It's the type of book that older kids (and adults) will find very funny.--John Peters, New York Public Library - Copyright 1989 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

Booklist - 09/01/1989 *Starred Review* Readers who think they know their three little pigs haven’t heard Mr. A. Wolf’s side of the story. Why, it’s all a terrible misunderstanding, Mr. Wolf confides. It began when he was baking a birthday cake for his dear old granny and ran out of sugar. Like any neighbor, he thought he might borrow some from the pigs next door. How was he to know that his cold would erupt in great sneezes, blowing down houses of straw and sticks? And since the pigs were dead, eating them seemed like a better idea than letting them spoil. Then, he says, the cops (and reporters) arrived just as he was getting the third piggy’s attention; not surprisingly, his story of a sickly wolf simply trying to do a nice deed for his grandmother was soon distorted. Now Mr. Wolf is behind bars, trying to convince people he was framed. Tongue-in-cheek hardly described this droll telling. Both the text and the stylized new-wave drawings are hip and funny. Though this sanguine attitude may not play well with the youngest (Mr. Wolf ruminates on eating rabbits, and one memorable picture shows a cheeseburger with bunny ears coming out of the bun), older kids may have to wrest the book away from adults. - Copyright 1989 Booklist.

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