Bound To Stay Bound

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 I heard a sound
 Author: Ward, David J.

 Publisher:  Holiday House (2020)

 Dewey: 534
 Classification: Nonfiction
 Physical Description: 40 p., col. ill., 28 cm

 BTSB No: 920077 ISBN: 9780823437047
 Ages: 6-9 Grades: 1-4

 Subjects:
 Sound
 Science -- Experiments
 Hearing

Price: $22.16

Summary:
Learn the science of sound with easy experiments and examples from everyday life.

 Illustrator: Comstock, Eric

Reviews:
   School Library Journal (07/01/20)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 07/01/2020 PreS-Gr 3—Ideas for experiments abound in this picture book that speaks directly to readers and explains the science of sound. Every concept is illustrated and has an easily reproduced activity. Sound is defined as "tiny vibrations that our ears can sense." In order to demonstrate how a person's vocal cords vibrate, readers are instructed to put one hand on their throat and talk. Then, the text describes how to use a balloon and a cardboard tube to show how vocal cords work. A spring toy depicts the movement of sound waves. Intriguing experiments provide directions to make a pan flute and a string telephone. A spread toward the end of the book illustrates and defines the terms ear canal and eardrum. The text explains that brains interpret eardrum vibrations as sound, but there is no mention of individuals who are Deaf or hard of hearing. VERDICT A useful resource for everyday science lessons. Recommended for classroom use and school and public libraries.—Kacy Helwick, New Orleans P.L. - Copyright 2020 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

School Library Journal - 07/01/2020 PreS-Gr 3—Ideas for experiments abound in this picture book that speaks directly to readers and explains the science of sound. Every concept is illustrated and has an easily reproduced activity. Sound is defined as "tiny vibrations that our ears can sense." In order to demonstrate how a person's vocal cords vibrate, readers are instructed to put one hand on their throat and talk. Then, the text describes how to use a balloon and a cardboard tube to show how vocal cords work. A spring toy depicts the movement of sound waves. Intriguing experiments provide directions to make a pan flute and a string telephone. A spread toward the end of the book illustrates and defines the terms ear canal and eardrum. The text explains that brains interpret eardrum vibrations as sound, but there is no mention of individuals who are Deaf or hard of hearing. VERDICT A useful resource for everyday science lessons. Recommended for classroom use and school and public libraries.—Kacy Helwick, New Orleans P.L. - Copyright 2020 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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