Bound To Stay Bound

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 In Andal's house
 Author: Whelan, Gloria

 Illustrator: Hall, Amanda

 Publisher:  Sleeping Bear Press
 Pub Year: 2013

 Classification: Fiction
 Physical Description: [33] p., col. ill., 28 cm.

 BTSB No: 937741 ISBN: 9781585366033
 Ages: 7-9 Grades: 2-4

 Subjects:
 Prejudices -- Fiction
 Social classes -- Fiction
 India -- Fiction

Price: $6.50

Summary:
Kumar, a young boy living in present-day India, faces bigotry when he goes to visit a classmate from a higher caste family.

Series:
Tales Of The World


Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: LG
   Reading Level: 4.40
   Points: .5   Quiz: 158692

Common Core Standards 
   Grade 2 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 2.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 2 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 2.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 2 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, & Rang
   Grade 3 → Reading → RL Literature → 3.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 3 → Reading → RL Literature → 3.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 3 → Reading → RL Literature → Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, & Rang



Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 04/20/2013 Gr 2–4—In this introduction to the Hindu caste system, Kumar is invited to his friend Andal's house to watch the fireworks for the celebration of Diwali. Andal is high-caste Brahmin, and his family is very wealthy. Kumar's family had been outcasts and are concerned about the visit. Kumar is the best student in his class and believes that is why Andal invited him. When he arrives at his friend's large home, he is met by Andal's grandmother, who tells him, "we cannot have a boy of no caste in our home. It would never do." Kumar returns home to his grandfather, who explains how things used to be and that at least now there are laws against discrimination that make everyone equal. He reminds his grandson that it wasn't Andal who turned him away. The story ends with Kumar feeling hopeful about his future as he dreams of the Diwali lamps lighting up the darkness. This picture book has vibrant and colorful artwork. It will have a place in collections that want to show how discrimination of any kind adversely affects young people. Readers will also see in Kumar the power of perseverance.—Nancy Jo Lambert, Ruth Borchardt Elementary, Plano, TX - Copyright 2013 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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