Bound To Stay Bound

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 Rebound
 Author: Alexander, Kwame

 Illustrator: Anyabwile, Dawud

 Publisher:  Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
 Pub Year: 2018

 Classification: Fiction
 Physical Description: 414 p., ill., 22 cm

 BTSB No: 050639 ISBN: 9780544868137
 Ages: 10-12 Grades: 5-7

 Subjects:
 Novels in verse
 Basketball -- Fiction
 Families -- Fiction
 African Americans -- Fiction
 Washington (D.C.) -- History -- 20th century -- Fiction

Price: $20.01

Summary:
In the summer of 1988, twelve-year-old Chuck Bell is sent to stay with his grandparents, where he discovers jazz and basketball and learns more about his family's past.

Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: MG
   Reading Level: 4.30
   Points: 4.0   Quiz: 194054
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: 6-8
   Reading Level: 4.70
   Points: 9.0   Quiz: 72808

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (+) (03/15/18)
   School Library Journal (+) (04/01/18)
   Booklist (+) (03/15/18)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (00/05/18)
 The Hornbook (+) (00/07/18)

Full Text Reviews:

Booklist - 03/15/2018 *Starred Review* It’s the end of the school year in 1988, and Charlie Bell is flattened by the death of his father. Charlie tries to hide in the pages of his comic book collection, much to his mother’s despair. Finally she ships him off to stay with his grandparents for the summer. At first it’s just a fresh form of misery, as Charlie’s acidic grandfather goads him into physical activity in the stifling heat. Then his cousin Roxie coaxes him onto the basketball court. It’s the combination of family, friends, and mad new skills that finally help Charlie begin to rebound from his father’s death. Charlie Bell is the father of twins Jordan and Josh Bell, stars of Alexander’s Newbery Medal–winning novel Crossover (2014). Fans of Crossover will remember that Chuck “Da Man” Bell played professional basketball, and they’ll be intrigued by his initial resistance to learning the game. But this is an Alexander production, so the plot, as rich and satisfying as it is, is outdazzled by the brilliance of wordplay and syntax. There is a rhythm to each page, whether it’s the snappy give-and-take of dialogue, the throbbing of Charlie’s bottomless melancholy, or the rushing excitement of a basketball game. In addition, comics-style illustrations by Emmy-­winning artist Anyabwile bring Charlie’s fantasies of basketball glory to life. Librarians who delighted at Crossover’s popularity will be thrilled with this pitch-perfect follow-up. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Alexander is unstoppable, and his fans will be too. Have extra copies at the ready. - Copyright 2018 Booklist.

School Library Journal - 04/01/2018 Gr 6 Up—In this prequel/companion to the acclaimed The Crossover, readers meet a young Charlie Bell, father of the twins from the first book. It's 1988, and Charlie just lost his dad to a heart attack. Suppressing his grief and alienating himself from his concerned mother, Charlie gets in trouble, which results in him spending the summer with his paternal grandparents. Granddaddy is a no-nonsense, jazz-loving man, who quickly puts "Chuck" in his place and demands that the sullen teenager help out around the house and spend time with his cousin Roxie shooting hoops. Not a natural baller, Chuck gets schooled by Roxie and slowly improves his game. With firm but loving support from his family and friends, he learns to refocus and get in touch with his emotions. In a high-stakes tournament, Roxie and Chuck learn that "it's okay/to be down/and upset/as long as/you're not down/and out." As in his previous novels in verse, Alexander shows off his expert command of the format, employing staccato breaks with smooth rhymes that mimic the bounce and flow of the sport. Interspersed are several comic panels illustrated by Anyabwile, which serve as fantastical imaginings—Chuck Bell dominating on the court like a superhero from his favorite comic books. As Chuck works his way through deep grief and deals with the consequences of some bad decisions, his voice is always fresh and compelling; Alexander's poetry is buoyant and optimistic. VERDICT Fans of The Crossover will delight in learning the origin tale of Josh and JB's dad, while new readers can comfortably jump right into the game.—Kiera Parrott, School Library Journal - Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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