Bound To Stay Bound

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 Across the bay
 Author: Aponte, Carlos


 Publisher:  Penguin Workshop
 Pub Year: 2019

 Classification: Easy
 Physical Description: [32] p., col. ill., 26 cm

 BTSB No: 064598 ISBN: 9781524786625
 Ages: 3-7 Grades: K-2

 Subjects:
 Family life -- Fiction
 Puerto Ricans -- Fiction
 Puerto Rico -- Fiction

Price: $20.71

Summary:
A picture book about a boy's memories of Puerto Rico, his family, and a colorful island of proud people.


Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (07/15/19)
   School Library Journal (09/01/19)
   Booklist (08/01/19)

Full Text Reviews:

Booklist - 08/01/2019 Carlitos lives with his mother and his abuela in Cataño, Puerto Rico. Though he’s happy in his cozy house, his family is different because his father is gone, living somewhere across the bay in San Juan. An idea forms: he’ll bring a photo of his father and take the ferry to the capital. He shows the picture to strangers, and some offer suggestions. He wanders until the only place left to look is the El Morro castle. But there’s no Papi, and his photo is lost. The kind words of a park ranger offer solace: no matter the dark clouds, the sun will eventually return. Aponte does a fine job of taking on a poignant problem without overwhelming the story with sadness. Much of the heavy lifting is done by the effusive art, done in the style of mid-century artwork, with thick lines around fancifully shaped characters, including hidden gems like the cats that follow Carlitos. The lushly colored art is suffused with an animation that reminds readers that life is always moving, a good lesson for any age group. - Copyright 2019 Booklist.

School Library Journal - 09/01/2019 PreS-Gr 2—Missing a father in his life, a young boy goes searching for him. Carlitos lives in the town of Cataño in Puerto Rico, a town just across the bay from the capital city of San Juan. Carlitos leads a happy life with his mother, abuela, and cat, Coco. But he doesn't like going to the barbershop, where he feels left out when he sees all of the other boys accompanied by their dads. Knowing his father lives in San Juan, the boy finds an old photo of him, grabs some money, and tiptoes out of the house and to the ferry terminal. Predictably, he doesn't find his father but instead realizes how important the family he does have is to him. Aponte's color-filled illustrations capture the vibrancy and warmth of Carlitos's environment. As the boy walks the streets of San Juan, readers familiar with the city will easily recognize it. The text, however, is inconsistent. For example, the absence of a father is explained as, "most families in Carlitos's town looked the same. His family didn't look like the others." It is also somewhat jarring when the barber greets Carlitos's mother as "Doña Carmen" but she responds with a simple "Francisco." Is she asserting social privilege? VERDICT Though not without flaws, this book with a Puerto Rican setting may be considered as a secondary purchase.—Lucia Acosta, Children's Literature Specialist, Princeton, NJ - Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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