Bound To Stay Bound

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 Wild robot escapes
 Author: Brown, Peter


 Publisher:  Little, Brown
 Pub Year: 2018

 Classification: Fiction
 Physical Description: 279 p., ill., 20 cm

 BTSB No: 162541 ISBN: 9780316382045
 Ages: 8-12 Grades: 3-7

 Subjects:
 Robots -- Fiction
 Farm life -- Fiction
 Domestic animals -- Fiction
 Science fiction

Price: $19.81

Summary:
After being captured by the RECOs and returned to civilization for reprogramming, Roz is sent to Hilltop Farm where she befriends her owner's family and animals, but pines for her son, Brightbill.

Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: MG
   Reading Level: 5.10
   Points: 5.0   Quiz: 193663
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: 3-5
   Reading Level: 4.40
   Points: 9.0   Quiz: 72801

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (02/15/18)
   School Library Journal (+) (03/01/18)
   Booklist (+) (01/01/18)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (00/03/18)

Full Text Reviews:

Booklist - 01/01/2018 *Starred Review* Brown merely whetted readers’ appetites for adventure with the exploits of kind, brave Roz in The Wild Robot (2016), particularly given the robot’s dramatic departure from her island home. In this stellar sequel, Roz powers up, repaired and with memories intact, on a family farm, which she has been purchased to run. While she gives every appearance of being a normal robot, Roz constantly dreams of returning home. By speaking with animals, Roz gets word of her plight to a young goose named Brightbill, her adoptive son, and he flies to her rescue. With the help of the farmer’s children, Roz and Brightbill flee, but their success is far from assured. Wolves, watery expanses, bustling cities, and old enemies—the RECO robots—all stand in their way, and Brown’s protagonists confront each in exhilarating and heart-stopping ways. Warmth and gentleness course through the novel, even as dangers emerge. Roz isn’t programmed for violence, and the narrator acts as an honest and reassuring friend who periodically breaks from storytelling to explain difficult truths to young readers. The novel’s near-future setting gives rise to questions pertaining to the division between humans and machines as well as the idea that different isn’t the same as defective. Though illustrations were unavailable for review, Brown’s artistic talents should only elevate his exceptional conclusion to Roz’s saga. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: The Wild Robot was a runaway success, so expect nothing less of its sequel. - Copyright 2018 Booklist.

School Library Journal - 03/01/2018 Gr 3–6—The lovable robot, Roz (The Wild Robot), was last seen being ripped away from her goose son, Brightbill, and hauled unwillingly back to the factory for the Makers to repair and reassign her. She is reactivated on Hilltop Farm, where Mr. Shareef expects her to tend to farm duties, including caring for the many cows and making repairs around the farm. She is programmed to obey orders, including those from Mr. Shareef's children, Jaya and Jad. Roz is homesick for her prior life on the remote island with her goose son, and all of her other animal friends, but she feels trapped, and fears Mr. Shareef will find out her secret—that she is "defective" and able to think, plan, and speak the languages of the animals. Roz is torn: while she enjoys helping on the farm and spending time with the children, she desires a reunion with her son even more. With the children's help and blessing, and the cows' assistance, Roz develops an escape plan. Readers need not have read the first installment to enjoy this sequel, though fans will root for Roz and Brightbill's reunion. Brown's illustrative talent is featured in black-and-white drawings throughout. VERDICT Science fiction meets fantasy in this delightful sequel that gives readers a unique look into what technology could someday have in store. A must-buy for any middle grade collection.—Michele Shaw, Quail Run Elementary School, San Ramon, CA - Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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