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 Does a kangaroo have a mother, too?
 Author: Carle, Eric


 Publisher:  HarperCollins
 Pub Year: 2000

 Dewey: 591.3
 Classification: Nonfiction
 Physical Description: [28] p., col. ill., 23 x 28 cm.

 BTSB No: 186255 ISBN: 9780060287689
 Ages: 3-6 Grades: K-1

 Subjects:
 Animal babies

Price: $14.42

Summary:
Presents the names of animal babies, parents, and groups, for example, a baby kangaroo is a joey, its mother is a flyer, its father is a boomer, and a group of kangaroos is a troop, mob, or herd.

Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: K-2
   Reading Level: 1.50
   Points: 1.0   Quiz: 21867

Common Core Standards 
   Grade K → Reading → RI Informational Text → K.RI Key Ideas & Details
   Grade K → Reading → RI Informational Text → K.RI Craft & Structure
   Grade K → Reading → RI Informational Text → K.RI Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade K → Reading → RI Informational Text → K.RI Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade K → Reading → RI Informational Text → Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, & Rang
   Grade 1 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 1.RL Craft & Structure
   Grade 1 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 1.RI Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 1 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 1.RI Craft & Structure
   Grade 1 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 1.RI Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade 1 → Reading → RI Informational Text → Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, & Rang
   Grade 1 → Reading → CCR - College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards
   Grade 1 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 1.RI Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity

Reviews:
   School Library Journal (04/00)
   Booklist (01/01)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (A) (04/00)

Full Text Reviews:

Bulletin for the Center... - 04/01/2000 Carle’s newest picture book, sporting his hallmark collages composed of varied color and patterns, takes a look at motherhood. The text hits the ground running, asking on the title page, “Does a kangaroo have a mother, too?” Carle answers the question on his opening page (“YES!/ A KANGAROO has a mother./ Just like me and you”), only to test again: “Does a lion have a mother, too?” Though preschoolers will enjoy the predictability of the call-and-response format and the gentle reassurance of the last page (“YES! YES! Of course they do./ Animal mothers love their babies, just as yours loves you”), Carle’s lengthy repetitive text lacks the energy associated with other similarly formatted books such as Williams’ I Went Walking (BCCB 12/90) or even Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? Terminology for each species’ babies, parents, and groups is appended. - Copyright 2000 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.

Booklist - 01/01/2000 Almost no author/illustrator over the past 30 years has played a more prominent role in the literary lives of preschoolers than Eric Carle. His large, inviting graphic animals have consistently delighted and taught children during early stages of development. This latest effort is no exception. The structure is appropriately simple. First, the question, Does a Kangaroo have a mother, too? followed on the next page by the answer, Yes! A Kangaroo does have a mother! Just like me and you, along with a charming illustration of mother and offspring. The question is then repeated using a new animal--a giraffe, a swan, an elephant, etc.--12 animals in all. But in addition to simply introducing children to wildlife, Carle emphasizes the connection between humans and animals through portrayals of the mother-child bond of love; he also shows how humans bond to the natural world. The names of parents, young, and groups of each species are listed on the final page. (Reviewed January 1 & 15, 2000) - Copyright 2000 Booklist.

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