Bound To Stay Bound

View MARC Record
To save an image, right click the thumbnail and choose "Save target as..." or "Save link as..."
 Before she was Harriet
 Author: Cline-Ransome, Lesa

 Illustrator: Ransome, James

 Publisher:  Holiday House
 Pub Year: 2017

 Dewey: 973.7115
 Classification: Biography
 Physical Description: [31] p., col. ill., 28 cm

 BTSB No: 222880 ISBN: 9780823420476
 Ages: 5-8 Grades: K-3

 Subjects:
 Tubman, Harriet, -- 1820?-1913
 Slaves
 African Americans -- Biography
 African American women -- Biography
 Underground Railroad

Price: $20.49

Summary:
Poetry that celebrates the diverse accomplishments of Harriet Tubman as revealed by her many names.

Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: LG
   Reading Level: 4.50
   Points: .5   Quiz: 193579

Awards:
 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor, 2018

Common Core Standards 
   Grade 2 → Reading → RI Informational Text → Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, & Rang
   Grade 2 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 2.RI Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 2 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 2.RI Craft & Structure
   Grade 2 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 2.RI Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade 3 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 3.RI Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 3 → Reading → RI Informational Text → Texts Illustrating Complexity, Quality, & Range of
   Grade 3 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 3.RI Craft & Structure
   Grade 3 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 3.RI Integration of Knowledge & Ideas

Reviews:
   School Library Journal (+) (10/01/17)
   Booklist (+) (09/01/17)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (00/12/17)
 The Hornbook (00/01/18)

Full Text Reviews:

Booklist - 09/01/2017 *Starred Review* In reverse chronology, Harriet Tubman’s multifaceted accomplishments come to life through poetic text and vivid watercolor images. Suffragist, general, spy, nurse, Aunt Harriet, Moses, conductor, Minty, Araminta—each name she was called is briefly outlined in text that works on many levels. The poetic text and artistic presentation are simultaneously simple enough for young children to understand and sophisticated enough to inspire adults. Dramatic images, such as Tubman in a boat on the Combahee River with Union soldiers and previously enslaved people, may encourage middle- and high-school students to investigate more about her life. Recalling Tubman’s association with the Underground Railroad, the Ransomes cleverly frame the story in a train journey. As Tubman boards the train, her aged face, beautiful and determined, is followed immediately by a large portrait of her in earlier days, alone under a star-filled sky. Once those associations are established, they explore each role, with subsequent page spreads depicting her work for women’s rights, in the Civil War, and leading others to freedom. Taking her story all the way to childhood is an evocative way for young readers to understand how each stage of her life developed. The final page returns to Tubman on the train, continuing her journey as a free person. Libraries likely already have many Harriet Tubman books, but this well-designed, unique approach warrants making room for one more. - Copyright 2017 Booklist.

School Library Journal - 10/01/2017 Gr 3–6—Before and after Harriet Tubman became the stalwart conductor leading enslaved people to freedom on the Underground Railroad, she played many remarkable roles during her long life. Cline-Ransome honors Tubman in lyrical verse, beginning when the heroine is "tired and worn/her legs stiff/her back achy." In each stanza, Tubman looks back to the time "before she was an old woman." She recalls speaking out against injustice as a suffragist providing "a voice for women/who had none/in marriages/in courts/in voting booths." She recollects everything she accomplished during the Civil War, spying for the Union and nursing the wounded. Looking back even farther, she remembers leading her people out of bondage and then her own arduous years in the slave owners' fields. Before all of this, Tubman was a little girl named Araminta who dreamed of the time she would "leave behind slavery/along with her name/and pick a new one/Harriet." Each episode in her compelling life is illustrated by a luminous watercolor. The expertly done expressive paintings evoke Tubman's strength and integrity showing "the wisp of a woman with the courage of a lion." VERDICT This lovely tribute effectively communicates Tubman's everlasting bravery and resolve, and will inspire curious readers to learn more.—Linda L. Walkins, Saint Joseph Preparatory High School, Boston - Copyright 2017 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

View MARC Record
Loading...