Bound To Stay Bound

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 Flora & Ulysses : the illuminated adventures
 Author: DiCamillo, Kate

 Illustrator: Campbell, K. G

 Publisher:  Candlewick Press
 Pub Year: 2013

 Classification: Fiction
 Physical Description: 231 p., ill., 21 cm.

 BTSB No: 276761 ISBN: 9780763660406
 Ages: 8-12 Grades: 3-7

 Subjects:
 Humorous fiction
 Superheroes -- Fiction
 Squirrels -- Fiction

Courtesy of Random Audio

Price: $6.50

Summary:
A cynic meets an unlikely superhero in a novel interspersed with comic-style graphic sequences and full-page illustrations.

Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: MG
   Reading Level: 4.30
   Points: 5.0   Quiz: 160221
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: 3-5
   Reading Level: 3.10
   Points: 9.0   Quiz: 61258

Awards:
 Newbery Award, 2014

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (+) (07/01/13)
   School Library Journal (+) (08/01/13)
   Booklist (+) (06/01/13)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (A) (00/11/13)
 The Hornbook (00/09/13)

Full Text Reviews:

Booklist - 06/01/2013 *Starred Review* The story begins with a vacuum cleaner. And a squirrel. Or, to be more precise, a squirrel who gets sucked into a Ulysses Super Suction wielded by Flora’s neighbor, Mrs. Tickham. The rather hairless squirrel that is spit out is not the same one that went in. That squirrel had only one thought: “I’m hungry.” After Flora performs CPR, the rescued squirrel, newly named Ulysses, is still hungry, but now he has many thoughts in his head. Foremost is his consideration of Flora’s suggestion that perhaps he is a superhero like The Amazing Incandesto, whose comic-book adventures Flora read with her father. (Drawing on comic-strip elements, Campbell’s illustrations here work wonderfully well.) Since Flora’s father and mother have split up, Flora has become a confirmed and defiant cynic. Yet it is hard to remain a cynic while one’s heart is opening to a squirrel who can type (“Squirtl. I am . . . born anew”), who can fly, and who adores Flora. Newbery winner DiCamillo is a master storyteller, and not just because she creates characters who dance off the pages and plots, whether epic or small, that never fail to engage and delight readers. Her biggest strength is exposing the truths that open and heal the human heart. She believes in possibilities and forgiveness and teaches her audience that the salt of life can be cut with the right measure of love. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: DiCamillo has a devoted following, plus this book has an extensive marketing campaign. That equals demand. - Copyright 2013 Booklist.

School Library Journal - 08/01/2013 Gr 4–6—Flora, obsessed with superhero comics, immediately recognizes and gives her wholehearted support to a squirrel that, after a near-fatal brush with a vacuum cleaner, develops the ability to fly and type poetry. The 10-year-old hides her new friend from the certain disapproval of her self-absorbed, romance-writer mother, but it is on the woman's typewriter that Ulysses pours out his creations. Like DiCamillo's The Magician's Elephant (Candlewick, 2009), this touching piece of magical realism unfolds with increasing urgency over a mere few days and brings its somewhat caricatured, old-fashioned characters together into what becomes a supportive community for all. Campbell's rounded and gentle soft-penciled illustrations, at times in the form of panel art furthering the action, wonderfully match and add to the sweetness of this oddball story. Rife with marvelously rich vocabulary reminiscent of the early superhero era (e.g., "Holy unanticipated occurrences!") and amusing glimpses at the world from the point of view of Ulysses the supersquirrel, this book will appeal to a broad audience of sophisticated readers. There are plenty of action sequences, but the novel primarily dwells in the realm of sensitive, hopeful, and quietly philosophical literature.—Rhona Campbell, Georgetown Day School, Washington, DC - Copyright 2013 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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