Bound To Stay Bound

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 Birthday cake for George Washington
 Author: Ganeshram, Ramin

 Illustrator: Brantley-Newton, Vanessa

 Publisher:  Scholastic Press
 Pub Year: 2016

 Classification: Fiction
 Physical Description: [32] p., col. ill., 28 cm.

 BTSB No: 365839 ISBN: 9780545538237
 Ages: 7-9 Grades: 2-4

 Subjects:
 Washington, George, -- 1732-1799 -- Fiction
 Slaves -- Fiction
 Cooks -- Fiction
 Father-daughter relationship -- Fiction
 Cake -- Fiction
 African Americans -- Fiction
 United States -- History -- 1783-1815 -- Fiction
 Philadelphia (Pa.) -- History -- 1783-1815 -- Fiction

Price: $6.50

Summary:
It is President Washington's birthday, and Hercules, Washington's slave and head chef, is planning to bake a special cake, provided he and his daughter can find a substitute for sugar.


Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (12/01/15)
   School Library Journal (-) (12/01/15)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 12/01/2015 Gr 1–3—A troubling depiction of American slavery. In a famous Philadelphia kitchen, chef Hercules prepares to make the perfect birthday cake for his master, President George Washington. When he discovers that there is no more sugar in the pantry, Hercules scrambles to find a suitable substitute, enlisting the help of the other slaves and servants. Based on the real figure of Hercules, who was owned by the first president and served as his chef, the story is told through the eyes of Hercules's young daughter, Delia, who describes her papa as a "general in the kitchen." The text explains that Hercules was one of Washington's most trusted slaves and was given more freedom than most; he could be seen in fine clothes walking the streets of Philadelphia or enjoying tickets to the theater. The story revolves around Hercules, Delia, and the other slaves finding a replacement for the sugar and carefully baking the cake. Brantley-Newton's colorful, cartoon-style double-page illustrations, combined with the light tone of the text, convey a feeling of joyfulness that contrasts starkly with the reality of slave life. One spread depicts dancing feet and the hems of fancy dresses and shoes of the white revelers at the very top of the page. Hercules, Delia, and the other slaves are seen in the kitchen below, smiling with glee as they work on the cake, evoking a strangely cheerful and exuberant scene reminiscent of a Disney film. Later, when Washington congratulates Hercules on a job well done, Hercules responds, "An honor and a privilege, sir." Young readers without sufficient background knowledge about the larger context of American slavery may come away with a dangerously rosy impression of the relationship between slaves and slave owners, and those with a deeper understanding are likely to find this depiction offensive. An appended note explains that Hercules was a real person, now thought of by some culinary historians as "the first celebrity chef in America." Ganeshram states that Hercules eventually escaped but that his children, including narrator Delia, were owned by Martha Washington and remained enslaved their entire lives. The somber facts recounted in small print at the end of the author's note are unfortunately not reflected in either the text or the illustrations of the story that precedes them. Adding insult to injury, the back matter concludes with a recipe for "Martha Washington's Great Cake," courtesy of the Mount Vernon Ladies Association. VERDICT A highly problematic work; not recommended.—Kiera Parrott, School Library Journal - Copyright 2015 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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