Bound To Stay Bound

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 Higher, steeper, faster : the daredevils who conquered the skies
 Author: Goldstone, Lawrence


 Publisher:  Little, Brown
 Pub Year: 2017

 Dewey: 629.1309
 Classification: Nonfiction
 Physical Description: 243 p., ill., 23 cm

 BTSB No: 384806 ISBN: 9780316350235
 Ages: 8-12 Grades: 3-7

 Subjects:
 Air pilots -- History
 Daredevils -- History
 Flight -- History
 Aeronautics -- History

Price: $21.41

Summary:
The pioneers of early flight performed death-defying feats and broke new technological ground as they took to the skies to thrill crowds and advance the boundaries of human innovation.

Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: MG
   Reading Level: 7.70
   Points: 7.0   Quiz: 188793
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: 6-8
   Reading Level: 11.50
   Points: 11.0   Quiz: 70937

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (+) (02/01/17)
   School Library Journal (03/01/17)
   Booklist (03/15/17)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (00/04/17)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 03/01/2017 Gr 4 Up—Goldstone, author of the adult title Birdmen: The Wright Brothers, Glenn Curtiss, and the Battle To Control the Skies, ventures into books for young people for the first time. What follows is an overview of early aviation history, with a focus on the exploits of record setters including Lincoln J. Beachey, Glenn Curtiss, Emory Malick, and Harriet Quimby. By expanding the scope beyond familiar figures such as the Wright brothers, Goldstone brings the legends behind death-defying acts to life, exploring how competition can lead to innovation. For instance, most early pilots built or tweaked their own aircraft. The writing style is engaging, and students curious about flight will appreciate the read. Though the chapters are somewhat linked, each one could also work as a stand-alone resource for reports or as a classroom read-aloud. The progression of aviation technology connects well with STEM curricula and could inspire experiments or projects that continue the "research" of the daredevils whose achievements fill the volume. The use of black-and-white photos will likely deter younger readers, making this selection best suited for middle schoolers. VERDICT School libraries in need of engaging historical nonfiction should consider for purchase.—Sarah Knutson, American Canyon Middle School, CA - Copyright 2017 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

Booklist - 03/15/2017 While the cautious, conservative Wright brothers get the credit for the first successful sustained flight, the stunt and exhibition pilots who followed in their wake really pushed the boundaries of aviation development and technology. Their need for sturdier, sleeker, faster planes ushered in a decade of innovation that stretched from airfields in the U.S. to, eventually, the battlefields of WWI Europe. Numerous figures are featured here, but the history is framed within the story of thrill-seeking, celebrated pilot Lincoln Beachey. There are plenty of names to keep track of, and the action moves back and forth across the Atlantic as American and European inventors try to outdo each other. Fortunately, clear writing and chronological storytelling makes it easy for the reader to follow. Original photographs, contemporary publicity, and newspaper articles provide visuals, while sidebars offer supplementary tidbits. This look at the early days of the industry highlights the thrill and awe of a watching public as well as the fact that the sky was no longer any sort of boundary. - Copyright 2017 Booklist.

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