Bound To Stay Bound

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 Out of the dust
 Author: Hesse, Karen

 Publisher:  Scholastic Press (1997)

 Classification: Fiction
 Physical Description: 227 p.,  20 cm.

 BTSB No: 441509 ISBN: 9780590360807
 Ages: 9-12 Grades: 4-7

 Subjects:
 Dust storms -- Fiction
 Farm Life -- Oklahoma -- Fiction
 Oklahoma -- Fiction

Price: $22.28

Summary:
In a series of poems, fifteen-year-old Billie Jo relates the hardships of living on her family's wheat farm in Oklahoma during the dust bowl years of the Depression.

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Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: MG
   Reading Level: 5.30
   Points: 3.0   Quiz: 18783
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: 6-8
   Reading Level: 5.10
   Points: 5.0   Quiz: 08788

Awards:
 Newbery Medal, 1998

Common Core Standards 
   CC Maps Recommended Works Gde K-5
   Grade 5 → Reading → RL Literature → 5.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 5 → Reading → RL Literature → 5.RL Craft & Structure
   Grade 5 → Reading → RL Literature → 5.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 5 → Reading → RF Foundational Skills → 5.RF Phonics & Word Recognition
   Grade 5 → Reading → RF Foundational Skills → 5.RF Fluency
   Grade 5 → Reading → RL Literature → 5.RL Integration & Knowledge of Ideas
   Grade 5 → Reading → RL Literature → Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, & Rang
   Grade 5 → Reading → CCR College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards fo
   Grade 4 → Reading → RL Literature → 4.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 4 → Reading → RL Literature → 4.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 4 → Reading → RL Literature → 4.RL Craft & Structure
   Grade 4 → Reading → RL Literature → 4.RL Integration & Knowledge of Ideas
   Grade 4 → Reading → RL Literature → Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, & Rang
   Grade 3 → Reading → RF Foundational Skills → 3.RF Fluency
   Grade 6 → Reading → RL Literature → 6.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 6 → Reading → CCR College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards fo

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (09/15/97)
   School Library Journal (+) (09/97)
   Booklist (+) (10/01/97)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (12/97)
 The Hornbook (01/98)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 09/01/1997 Gr 5 Up--In the midst of the Dust Bowl, 13-year-old Billie Jo loses her mother and unborn brother in an accident that she is partly responsible for and burns her own hands so badly that she may never again find solace in her only pleasure--playing the piano. Growing ever more distant from her brooding father, she hops on a train going west, and discovers that there is no escaping the dust of her Oklahoma home--she is part of it and it is part of her. Hesse uses free-verse poems to advance the plot, allowing the narrator to speak for herself much more eloquently than would be possible in standard prose. The author's astute and careful descriptions of life during the dust storms of the 1930s are grounded in harsh reality, yet are decidedly poetic; they will fascinate as well as horrify today's readers. Hesse deals with questions of loss, forgiveness, home, and even ecology by exposing and exploring Billie Jo's feelings of pain, longing, and occasional joy. Readers may at first balk at a work of fiction written as poetry, but the language, imagery, and rhythms are so immediate that after only a few pages it will seem natural to have the story related in verse. This book is a wonderful choice for classrooms involved in journal-writing assignments, since the poems often read like diary entries. It could also be performed effectively as readers' theater. Hesse's ever-growing skill as a writer willing to take chances with her form shines through superbly in her ability to take historical facts and weave them into the fictional story of a character young people will readily embrace.--Carrie Schadle, New York Public Library - Copyright 1997 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

Booklist - 10/01/1997 *Starred Review* Daddy came in, / he sat across from Ma and blew his nose. / Mud streamed out. / He coughed and spit out / mud. / If he had cried, / his tears would have been mud too, / but he didn't cry. / And neither did Ma. This is life in the Oklahoma dust bowl in the mid-1930s. Billie Jo and her parents barely eke out a living from the land, as her father refuses to plant anything but wheat, and the winds and dust destroy the crop time after time. Playing the piano provides some solace, but there is no comfort to be had once Billie Jo's pregnant mother mistakes a bucket of kerosene for a bucket of water and dies, leaving a husband who withdraws even further and an adolescent daughter with terribly burned hands. The story is bleak, but Hesse's writing transcends the gloom and transforms it into a powerfully compelling tale of a girl with enormous strength, courage, and love. The entire novel is written in very readable blank verse, a superb choice for bringing out the exquisite agony and delight to be found in such a difficult period lived by such a vibrant character. It also spares the reader the trouble of wading through pages of distressing text, distilling all the experiences into brief, acutely observed phrases. This is an excellent book for discussion, and many of the poems stand alone sufficiently to be used as powerful supplements to a history lesson. (Reviewed October 1, 1997) - Copyright 1997 Booklist.

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