Bound To Stay Bound

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 Eyes that speak to the stars
 Author: Ho, Joanna

 Publisher:  Harper (2022)

 Classification: Easy
 Physical Description: [34] p., col. ill., 28 cm

 BTSB No: 447627 ISBN: 9780063057753
 Ages: 4-8 Grades: K-3

 Subjects:
 Asian Americans -- Fiction
 Eye -- Fiction
 Personal appearance -- Fiction
 Self-realization -- Fiction

Price: $22.78

Summary:
A young Asian boy notices that his eyes look different from his friends'. His friend at school draws other boys' eyes big and round, but not his. He realizes his eyes are like his father's, grandfather's, and younger brother's. Drawing from the strength of the powerful men in his life, he recognizes his own importance and discovers a path to self-love and empowerment.

 Illustrator: Ho, Dung
Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: LG
   Reading Level: 4.40
   Points: .5   Quiz: 514932

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (12/01/21)
   School Library Journal (+) (11/01/21)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 11/01/2021 K-Gr 4—Ho's companion book to Eyes That Kiss in the Corners addresses the male side of the family after an upsetting incident leaves the narrator, whose name we never learn, feeling down. On a drawing of "My Friends," another boy has shown all of them with round eyes, except for the narrator's. His are two straight lines. Instead of hugging his father after school, the boy explains his sadness over the drawing, and is quickly consoled. "Your eyes rise to the skies and speak to the stars. The comets and constellations show you their secrets, and your eyes can foresee the future. Just like mine." The boy finds similar features in his agong's eyes, and in baby Di-Di's, too, "eyes that shine like runaway lights." As reassuring as the first book, willing to reach to the constellations as well as back through time to show what these eyes have seen, this entry not only complements the original, but extends the conversation beyond history and into a future of possibilities. The illustrations depict cultural icons, dragons, kites, temples, and structures that give the boy a sparkle in his eyes and make his life a celebration. VERDICT Together these books form a brilliant treatise to love of self and heritage, and belong on every shelf.—Kimberly Olson Fakih, School Library Journal - Copyright 2021 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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