Bound To Stay Bound

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 Boy who harnessed the wind
 Author: Kamkwamba, William

 Publisher:  Dial Books for Young Readers (2012)

 Dewey: 621.4
 Classification: Biography
 Physical Description: [32] p., col. ill., 28 cm.

 BTSB No: 506354 ISBN: 9780803735118
 Ages: 6-8 Grades: 1-3

 Subjects:
 Kamkwamba, William, -- 1987-
 Windmills
 Electrification
 Irrigation

Price: $22.08

Summary:
A boy learns to build a windmill to bring electricity to his village during a drought and famine.

 Added Entry - Personal Name: Mealer, Bryan
 Illustrator: Zunon, Elizabeth


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Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: LG
   Reading Level: 5.30
   Points: .5   Quiz: 148136
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: 3-5
   Reading Level: 6.30
   Points: 2.0   Quiz: 56310

Common Core Standards 
   Grade K → Reading → RI Informational Text → K.RI Key Ideas & Details
   Grade K → Reading → RI Informational Text → K.RI Craft & Structure
   Grade K → Reading → RI Informational Text → K.RI Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade K → Reading → RI Informational Text → K.RI Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade K → Reading → RI Informational Text → Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, & Rang
   Grade 1 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 1.RL Craft & Structure
   Grade 1 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 1.RI Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 1 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 1.RI Craft & Structure
   Grade 1 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 1.RI Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade 1 → Reading → RI Informational Text → Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, & Rang
   Grade 1 → Reading → CCR - College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards
   Grade 1 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 1.RI Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 2 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 2.RI Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 2 → Reading → CCR College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards fo
   Grade 2 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 2.RI Craft & Structure
   Grade 2 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 2.RI Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade 2 → Reading → RI Informational Text → 2.RI Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 2 → Reading → RI Informational Text → Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, & Rang

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (12/01/11)
   School Library Journal (01/01/12)
   Booklist (02/15/12)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (02/12)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 01/01/2012 K-Gr 3—Based on the best seller of the same title, this picture-book biography chronicles Kamkwamba's teen years in a Malawian village. As he tills the soil, his mind teems with a mix of mechanical questions and the magical stories relayed by his elders. When a drought destroys the crops, his education fund dries up as well. Kamkwamba seeks refuge in the American-built library, where, dictionary in hand, he decodes the function of a windmill that has captured his interest. Despite the murmurings of incredulous villagers, the young man assembles junkyard scraps to build "electric wind." The third-person descriptions and dialogue are flavored with African phrases. Zunon's compositions, rendered in cut paper and oils, create a variety of moods. Colorfully garbed ghost dancers populate the boy's dreams, while crumpled tan rice paper, arranged to depict a high horizon line just beneath a blazing sun, forms a parched landscape, overwhelming in scale. Swirls of patterned blue and green paper portray the wind that propels the blades of his creation. While an extensive author's note explains that it took several years to achieve the ability to irrigate, the lack of clear visuals to show how wind becomes electricity (and ultimately pumps water) may frustrate young children. That caveat aside, this is a dynamic portrait of a young person whose connection to the land, concern for his community, and drive to solve problems offer an inspiring model. It would pair well with one of the recent titles about Wangari Maathai.—Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library - Copyright 2012 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

Bulletin for the Center... - 02/01/2012 At age fourteen, William is forced to drop out of school; the drought in Malawi has wreaked havoc on his family’s crops and there is no money for tuition. He starts spending time at the American library, where he learns about windmills and their power to “produce electricity and pump water.” Determined (and, according to his neighbors, slightly “misala,” or crazy), he hits the junkyard and constructs a windmill that produces enough energy to light a small bulb. This is only the beginning for William, who later went on to create a solar-powered water pump in his family’s field and is currently an engineering student at Dartmouth with plans to return to Malawi “to work on renewable energy for electricity and pumping water in villages.” This young reader’s edition of Kamkwamba and Mealer’s bestselling adult title is perfectly whittled down for the picture-book set, and the story of William’s creativity and perseverance is well suited for young dreamers. The language is rich and evocative, from descriptions of the ravages of hunger (“alone with the monster in his belly and the lump in his throat”) to his imaginings of how a windmill could impact his village. Zunon’s compositions seamlessly combine oil paintings with touches of cut-paper collage work, and rich, unexpected colors and textures bring warmth and intensity to the scenes. Kamkwamba’s tale will appeal to a wide cross-section of kids, from those drawn to human-interest stories to those who like to construct and deconstruct things; supplementary details are provided in the extensive author’s note, which includes a photograph of William atop his actual windmill. HM - Copyright 2012 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.

Booklist - 02/15/2012 In his drought-stricken village in Malawi, Kamkwamba, 14, had to drop out of school, but he read about windmills in the library, and with scraps from the trash—including a tractor fan, a shock absorber, the frame of a broken bicycle, rusted bottle caps, and plastic pipes—he buildt a windmill tower that brought electricity to his village. Based on the adult best-selling version of a true story, this picture book in accessible free verse will draw kids who love to construct their own engineering gadgets. Especially appealing is the triumph of the young boy who bottled, banged, and tinkered and saved his grown-up world. Zunon’s double-page artwork, a blend of oil paintings and cut paper, shows the drought-stricken countryside and then the trash pieces the boy collects and recycles into a machine that makes energy for his community. The long afterword fills in more about the severe drought that brought famine and killed more than 10,000 people and about Kamkwamba’s engineering studies now. - Copyright 2012 Booklist.

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