Bound To Stay Bound

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 Land of forgotten girls
 Author: Kelly, Erin Entrada


 Publisher:  Greenwillow Books
 Pub Year: 2016

 Classification: Fiction
 Physical Description: 299 p.,  22 cm.

 BTSB No: 512262 ISBN: 9780062238641
 Ages: 8-12 Grades: 3-7

 Subjects:
 Family problems -- Fiction
 Immigrants -- Louisiana -- Fiction
 Sisters -- Fiction
 Stepmothers -- Fiction
 Filipino Americans -- Fiction
 Louisiana -- Fiction

Price: $20.01

Summary:
Abandoned by their father and living in poverty with their heartless stepmother in Louisiana, two sisters from the Philippines, twelve-year-old Sol and six-year-old Ming, learn the true meaning of family.

Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: MG
   Reading Level: 4.30
   Points: 6.0   Quiz: 181153
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: 3-5
   Reading Level: 3.70
   Points: 11.0   Quiz: 68598

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (-) (12/15/15)
   School Library Journal (00/12/15)
   Booklist (+) (01/01/16)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (00/05/16)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 12/01/2015 Gr 3–6—Soledad and Ming, two sisters from the Philippines, live in Louisiana with their evil stepmother, Vea. All Sol and Ming have is each other and their stories. Both girls inherited a lively imagination from their mother, Mei-Mei. When she was alive, Mei-Mei wove enthralling tales about her magical sister, Jove, who traveled around the world. The girls cling to tales of Auntie Jove as a hope of escape while living in a dreary apartment with miserable Vea. Sol worries for her younger sister as Ming begins to believe Auntie Jove is a reality, blurring the lines between fact and fiction. Can Sol save her sister from the depression caused by her own stories, or have they done irreparable damage? Is there a way for Sol, Ming, and Vea to understand one another and be happy in their own reality? Readers will become engrossed in the enchanting plot propelled by delightful narration. This book will appeal to a broad array of readers, as it has a little bit of everything—fantasy, realism, sisterhood, friendship, suspense, and humor. VERDICT A charming and affecting novel about sisterhood, the magic of imagination, and perseverance.—Tiffany Davis, Mount Saint Mary College, Newburgh, NY - Copyright 2015 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

Booklist - 01/01/2016 *Starred Review* Soledad’s life in a small Louisiana town has its bleak aspects. The 12-year-old lives in low-income housing with rats in the walls, but worse than that is the evil stepmother who cares—as little as possible—for Sol and her younger sister, Ming. The girls came from the Philippines with their father and Vea, who only married him to get to America. Their father, however, returned to the Philippines, yet Vea keeps the girls for the assistance money. Despite all that is wrong in Sol’s world, she has a soaring imagination: a punishment closet can transform into a castle, and her third sister, who drowned back in the Philippines, can appear like an angel. There is purpose in Sol’s life, too: taking care of Ming and having fun with her friend Manny though his desire to kiss her seems silly. Kelly’s sophomore novel is both hopeful and heartfelt, but strong emotions are only part of the successful equation here. Told in Sol’s true voice, the direct dialogue brings the diverse characters to vivid life. For example, an elderly Chinese neighbor, who speaks almost no English, is so beautifully cast that dialogue isn’t even necessary. One caveat: the lighthearted cover depicting Sol and Ming having backyard fun may suggest to readers that this is a breezy read, when in truth, it is so much more. - Copyright 2016 Booklist.

School Library Journal - 12/01/2016 Gr 3–6—After their mother dies, Soledad and Ming's father brings his daughters and his new wife from the Philippines to the United States—and soon abandons them. Their stepmother, Vea, is angry and abusive, and Soledad spins stories for her younger sister to help them both survive. Themes of resilience, sisterhood, and the power of the imagination are interwoven in this tender, ultimately hopeful tale. - Copyright 2016 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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