Bound To Stay Bound

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 Chef Yasmina and the potato panic
 Author: Mannaert, Wauter

 Publisher:  First Second (2021)

 Dewey: 741.5
 Classification: Nonfiction
 Physical Description: 140 p., col. ill., 22 cm

 BTSB No: 600928 ISBN: 9781250622044
 Ages: 8-12 Grades: 3-7

 Subjects:
 Cooking -- Fiction
 Transgenic plants -- Fiction
 Genetically modified foods -- Fiction
 Human behavior -- Fiction
 Gardens -- Fiction
 Graphic novels

Price: $19.36

Summary:
Eleven-year-old Yasmina and her single dad lead a modest life in a cramped apartment in a bustling city. But even though money is tight, they eat like kings. Every day, Yasmina uses her cookbooks and fresh vegetables from the community garden to whip up gourmet meals. That is, until the day the garden is bulldozed and replaced by a field of scientifically enhanced potatoes that are addictive and that alter the behavior of those who eat them! In graphic novel format.


Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (01/01/21)
   School Library Journal (01/01/21)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (12/01/20)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 01/01/2021 Gr 4–7—Eleven-year-old budding chef and amateur urban plant forager Yasmina relies on the extra bounty of her feuding gardener friends Cyril and Marco to cook delicious vegetarian meals for herself and her debt-ridden father, Omran. When a shady businessman buys and demolishes Cyril's and Marco's gardens to start a nefarious potato enterprise, Yasmina resorts to stealing from the rooftop garden on their Belgian city apartment. Meanwhile, city residents who are addicted to a new brand of potatoes terrorize the streets. With the help of the reclusive but brilliant upstairs scientist Amaryllis, Yasmina, her father, and her friends must address the strange behavior. The narrative relies heavily on the art, resulting in pacing that ebbs and flows until the action heats up in the final third. Often, there are long stretches of pages that contain art but no dialogue, requiring readers to pay close attention to the illustrations. Mannaert immerses readers in urban and naturalistic settings, an effect aided by borderless panel shapes that grow and shrink. While creative visuals set the book apart, it lacks character background that would have added depth. Visual clues allude to Yasmina and her father being Muslim but do not provide a clear definition of their ethnicity. Bonus features include an author's note, a short comic about Belgians' love of French fries, and behind-the-scenes concept art. VERDICT Those without a solid grounding in the graphic novel format may have a hard time making it through. Still, for intrepid readers, this is a thought-provoking tale of plant hybridization gone awry that will spur discussion on food genetic modification and business ethics.—Pearl Derlaga, York County P.L., VA - Copyright 2021 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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