Bound To Stay Bound

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 Enemy pie
 Author: Munson, Derek

 Publisher:  Chronicle Books (2000)

 Classification: Easy
 Physical Description: [36] p., col. ill., 27 cm.

 BTSB No: 664505 ISBN: 9780811827782
 Ages: 3-8 Grades: K-3

 Subjects:
 Friendship -- Fiction
 Father-son relationship -- Fiction
 Pies -- Fiction

Price: $20.88

Summary:
Hoping that the enemy pie which his father makes will help him get rid of his enemy, a little boy finds that instead it helps make a new friend.

 Illustrator: King, Tara Calahan
Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: LG
   Reading Level: 3.20
   Points: .5   Quiz: 45222
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: K-2
   Reading Level: 3.10
   Points: 2.0   Quiz: 24973

Common Core Standards 
   Grade K → Reading → RL Literature → K.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade K → Reading → RL Literature → K.RL Craft & Structure
   Grade K → Reading → RL Literature → K.RL Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade 1 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 1.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 1 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 1.RL Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade 1 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 1.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 2 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 2.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 2 → Reading → RL Reading Literature → 2.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 2 → Reading → CCR College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards fo

Reviews:
   School Library Journal (02/01/17)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (A) (01/01)

Full Text Reviews:

Bulletin for the Center... - 01/01/2001 When a new boy named Jeremy Ross moves into the main character’s neighborhood, the nameless young narrator decides that Jeremy is ruining his summer. He turns to Dad, who offers a recipe for Enemy Pie, which the narrator hopes will somehow ruin Jeremy’s summer in return. Dad bakes the pie and tells his son that, in order for it to work, he has to spend a day with his enemy. True to the formula of such tales, Jeremy turns out to be a nice guy, and the day passes quickly. At dinner time, the boy invites Jeremy home to eat; when Enemy Pie is served, it turns out to be a regular, delicious pie, and the impulse for retribution is lost (as the main character says: “I just lost my best enemy”). The pacing drags during the day spent together, and the flat ending is unsatisfying after the buildup of suspense about the ingredients of Enemy Pie. Nevertheless, King’s illustrations are unusual and appealing, featuring human characters with oversized heads and widely spaced eyes atop thin bodies, set in a summer paradise of green lawns, tree houses, bicycles, and boomerangs. The vibrant colors of summer are softened with textures of colored pencils and pastels. Though weighted down with its predictable message, this is a cleanly written tale, and youngsters may appreciate it as a little piece of summertime pie. - Copyright 2001 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.

School Library Journal - 02/01/2017 RELATIONSHIP SKILLS; SOCIAL AWARENESS - Copyright 2017 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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