Bound To Stay Bound

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 Knish War on Rivington Street
 Author: Oppenheim, Joanne

 Illustrator: Davis, Jon

 Publisher:  Whitman
 Pub Year: 2017

 Classification: Easy
 Physical Description: [32] p., col. ill., 26 cm

 BTSB No: 690705 ISBN: 9780807541821
 Ages: 4-8 Grades: K-3

 Subjects:
 Immigrants -- Fiction
 Jews -- United States -- Fiction
 Dumplings -- Fiction
 Bakers -- Fiction
 Bakeries -- Fiction
 Competition (Psychology) -- Fiction
 Lower East Side (New York, N.Y.) -- History -- 20th century -- Fiction
 New York (N.Y.) -- History -- 1898-1951 -- Fiction

Price: $19.81

Summary:
Benny's family owns a knishery and sells delicious round dumplings. Then the Tisch family opens a store across the street-selling square knishes-and Benny's papa worries. So he lowers his prices! But Mr. Tisch does too. As each knishery tries to outdo the other, Benny helps his papa realize there's room on Rivington Street for more than one knishery.

Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: 3-5
   Reading Level: 3.20
   Points: 3.0   Quiz: 70740

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (06/01/17)
   Booklist (08/01/17)
 The Hornbook (00/09/17)

Full Text Reviews:

Booklist - 08/01/2017 Oy vey! Benny’s family has been selling scrumptious knishes—baked round dumplings filled with onions, cheese, and potatoes—since the family moved to America. But now the Tisch family has moved to Rivington Street on New York’s Lower East Side, with a knish store of their own. Bad enough the Tisch knish is square instead of round, but they’re selling it for a penny cheaper! So begins the knish war, which really happened in 1916. Oppenheim puts her own spin on the story, capturing all the humor of warring families cutting the cost of their knishes, handing out coupons, and fighting over every crumb. Davis’ watercolor illustrations emphasize the fun, the crowds, and the sly undercutting, until the mayor of New York enters the fray and solves the problem. Both tale and art (with neatly evocative costuming) bring readers back to the turn of the last century, but this story, with its keen observation of human nature, feels very much of today. A welcome jaunt that will be fun to share with young listeners. - Copyright 2017 Booklist.

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