Bound To Stay Bound

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 Year down yonder
 Author: Peck, Richard


 Publisher:  Dial Books for Young Readers
 Pub Year: 2000

 Classification: Fiction
 Physical Description: 130 p.,  22 cm.

 BTSB No: 707535 ISBN: 9780803725188
 Ages: 10-16 Grades: 5-11

 Subjects:
 Grandmothers -- Fiction
 Country life -- Fiction
 Illinois -- Fiction

Courtesy of Random House Audio

Price: $20.01

Summary:
During the recession of 1937, fifteen-year-old Mary Alice is sent to live with her feisty, larger-than-life grandmother in rural Illinois and comes to a better understanding of this fearsome woman. Sequel to: A long way from Chicago.

Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: MG
   Reading Level: 4.50
   Points: 4.0   Quiz: 44671
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: 6-8
   Reading Level: 4.90
   Points: 9.0   Quiz: 23032

Awards:
 Newbery Medal, 2001

Common Core Standards 
   CC Maps Recommended Works Gde K-5
   Grade 5 → Reading → RL Literature → 5.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 5 → Reading → RL Literature → 5.RL Craft & Structure
   Grade 5 → Reading → RL Literature → 5.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 5 → Reading → RF Foundational Skills → 5.RF Phonics & Word Recognition
   Grade 5 → Reading → RF Foundational Skills → 5.RF Fluency
   Grade 5 → Reading → RL Literature → 5.RL Integration & Knowledge of Ideas
   Grade 5 → Reading → RL Literature → Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, & Rang
   Grade 5 → Reading → CCR College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards fo
   Grade 6 → Reading → RL Literature → 6.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 6 → Reading → RL Literature → 6.RL Craft & Structure
   Grade 6 → Reading → RL Literature → 6.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 6 → Reading → CCR College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards fo
   Grade 6 → Reading → RL Literature → 6.RL Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade 4 → Reading → RL Literature → 4.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 4 → Reading → RL Literature → 4.RL Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity
   Grade 4 → Reading → RL Literature → 4.RL Craft & Structure
   Grade 4 → Reading → RL Literature → 4.RL Integration & Knowledge of Ideas
   Grade 4 → Reading → RL Literature → Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, & Rang
   Grade 7 → Reading → RL Literature → 7.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 7 → Reading → RL Literature → 7.RL Range of Reading & LEvel of Text Complexity
   Grade 7 → Reading → RL Literature → 7.RL Craft & Structure
   Grade 7 → Reading → RL Literature → 7.RL Integration of Knowledge & Ideas
   Grade 8 → Reading → RL Literature → 8.RL Key Ideas & Details
   Grade 7 → Reading → CCR College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (09/15)
   School Library Journal (+) (09/00)
   Booklist (+) (10/15)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (01/01)
 The Hornbook (11/00)

Full Text Reviews:

School Library Journal - 08/24/2000 Gr 5-8-Peck charms readers once again with this entertaining sequel to A Long Way from Chicago (Dial, 1998). This time, 15-year-old Mary Alice visits Grandma Dowdel alone for a one-year stay, while her parents struggle through the recession of 1937 looking for jobs and better housing. With her older brother, Joey, working out west in a government program, Mary Alice takes a turn at recounting memorable and pivotal moments of her year with Grandma. Beneath the woman's fierce independence and nonconformity, Mary Alice discovers compassion, humor, and intuition. She watches her grandmother exact the perfect revenge on a classmate who bullies her on the first day of school, and she witnesses her "shameless" tactics to solicit donations from Veteran's Day "burgoo" eaters whose contributions are given to Mrs. Abernathy's blind, paralyzed, war-veteran son. From her energetic, eccentric, but devoted Grandma, she learns not only how to cook but also how to deal honestly and fairly with people. At story's end, Mary Alice returns several years later to wed the soldier, Royce McNabb, who was her classmate during the year spent with Grandma. Again, Peck has created a delightful, insightful tale that resounds with a storyteller's wit, humor, and vivid description. Mary Alice's memories capture the atmosphere, attitudes, and lifestyle of the times while shedding light on human strengths and weak- nesses.-Gerry Larson, Durham School of the Arts, NC Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information. - Copyright 2000 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

Bulletin for the Center... - 01/01/2001 In this sequel to A Long Way from Chicago (BCCB 10/98), Mary Alice, now fifteen, is exiled to her grandmother’s house while her parents ride out a rough year of the Great Depression. Grandma Dowdel is as irascible as ever, using home- baked pies and home-brewed glue to wreak vengeance on a Halloween prankster with designs on her outhouse, shamelessly shaking down the neighbors for donations to support a widow and her invalid son, exposing family connections between a snooty member of the local DAR and the illegitimate offspring of the town “trash,” and thwarting the romantic designs of the postmistress-turned-nude-model on a WPA muralist. Mary Alice proves here to be as engaging a narrator as her older brother Joey has been, and once again disparate episodes are cunningly joined together by the adolescent’s steady realization that a deep well of tenderness lies beneath Grandma’s formidable exterior (“She knew me through and through. She had eyes in the back of her heart”). Readers who enjoyed Joey and Mary Alice’s last visit will find this trip equally satisfying. - Copyright 2001 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.

Booklist - 10/15/2000 *Starred Review* With the same combination of wit, gentleness, and outrageous farce as Peck's Newbery Honor book, Long Way from Chicago (1998), this sequel tells the story of Joey's younger sister, Mary Alice, 15, who spends the year of 1937 back with Grandma Dowdel in a small town in Illinois. It's still the Depression; Dad has lost his job, and Mary Alice has been sent from Chicago to live with Grandma and enroll in the hick-town's 25-student high school. As in the first book, much of the fun comes from the larger-than-life characters, whether it's the snobbish DAR ladies or the visiting WPA artist, who paints a nude picture of the postmistress (nude, not naked; he studied in Paris). The wry one-liners and tall tales are usually Grandma's (When I was a girl, we had to walk in our sleep to keep from freezing to death), or Mary Alice's commentary as she looks back (Everybody in this town knew everything about you. They knew things that hadn't even happened yet). That adult perspective is occasionally intrusive and Mary Alice sometimes seems younger than 15, though her awkward romance with a classmate is timeless. The heart of the book is Grandma--huge and overbearing, totally outside polite society. Just as powerful is what's hidden: Mary Alice discovers kindness and grace as well as snakes in the attic. Most moving is Mary Alice's own growth. During a tornado she leaves her shelter to make sure that Grandma is safe at home. In fact, as Mary Alice looks back, it's clear that Grandma has remained her role model, never more generous than when she helped her granddaughter leave. - Copyright 2000 Booklist.

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