Bound To Stay Bound

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 Girl who could fix anything : Beatrice Shilling, World War II engineer
 Author: Rockliff, Mara

 Publisher:  Candlewick Press (2021)

 Dewey: 629.130
 Classification: Biography
 Physical Description: [41] p., col. ill., 28 cm

 BTSB No: 761233 ISBN: 9781536212525
 Ages: 5-8 Grades: K-3

 Subjects:
 Shilling, Beatrice, -- 1909-1990
 Royal Aircraft Establishment (Great Britain)
 Women aeronautical engineers -- Biography
 Aeronautical engineers -- Biography
 World War, 1939-1945
 England

Price: $22.08

Summary:
When Beatrice left home to study engineering, she knew that as a girl she wouldn't be quite like the other engineers. It took hard work and perseverance to persuade the Royal Aircraft Establishment to give her a chance. When World War II broke out and British fighter pilots took to the skies in a desperate struggle for survival against Hitler's bombers, it was clearly time for new ideas. Could Beatrice solve an engine puzzle and help Britain win the war?

 Illustrator: Duncan, Daniel
Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: LG
   Reading Level: 3.80
   Points: .5   Quiz: 514350

Reviews:
   Kirkus Reviews (08/01/21)
   School Library Journal (07/01/21)
   Booklist (06/01/21)
 The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (00/07/21)
 The Hornbook (00/09/21)

Full Text Reviews:

Booklist - 06/01/2021 Beatrice Shilling, an innovative WWII British aviation engineer, was always a little different. Most kids liked candy; she liked tools. Most university students were boys; she definitely was not. Only daring men raced motorcycles—she not only raced, she won. And when the war started, most women wrote manuals. Not Beatrice: she taught Royal Air Force pilots how to take care of their airplane engines and keep them from freezing up and stalling during combat. This entertaining picture-book biography chronicles her life from childhood through school and apprenticeships, marriage, the war, and the rest of her illustrious career. The droll illustrations often show Beatrice happily tinkering away, surrounded by groups of exasperated men. The text acknowledges that she sometimes made mistakes; the illustrations show her crashing through a bedroom ceiling and fleeing from an engine block engulfed in flames. Back matter includes an author's note and a list of resources. This enjoyable tale works equally well as a read-aloud and a strong addition to Women in STEM collections. - Copyright 2021 Booklist.

School Library Journal - 07/01/2021 K-Gr 4—An uplifting look at a World War II—and STEM—heroine. Beatrice Shilling was different from the very beginning. Unlike other children she spent her pocket money on tools rather than candy, and she spent so much time building new creations and working on her motorcycle that when she was old enough, she became an apprentice engineer to bring electricity to villages in her area of England. When she went to study engineering at university, Beatrice realized that not only was she the only girl, but she was one of the best in her program. She was also one of the fastest, winning races on her specially modified motorcycle. It wasn't until World War II began that Beatrice was able to truly shine, traveling around the country to fix airplanes for the Royal Air Force. Only Beatrice, the girl who could fix anything, could tackle the biggest problem facing the fleet of the Royal Airforce—and help win the war. This engaging and inspiring read owes a lot of its appeal to Duncan's charming illustrations, featuring a determined, likable heroine. Author Rockliff has created a book that is simple enough for kindergarteners to enjoy while still being interesting for third and fourth graders—no easy feat. Further reading includes a more detailed background of the character, providing needed historical and cultural context. Includes an extensive list of sources. VERDICT A delightful and welcome addition to STEM collections everywhere.—Savannah Kitchens, Parnell Memorial Lib., Montevallo, AL - Copyright 2021 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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