Bound To Stay Bound

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 Dear Martin
 Author: Stone, Nic

 Publisher:  Ember (2018)

 Classification: Fiction
 Physical Description: 210 p.,  22 cm

 BTSB No: 857278 ISBN: 9781101939499
 Ages: 14-18 Grades: 9-12

 Subjects:
 King, Martin Luther, -- Jr., -- 1929-1968 -- Fiction
 Race relations -- Fiction
 Racism -- Fiction
 Racial profiling in law enforcement -- Fiction
 Police brutality -- Fiction
 African Americans -- Fiction
 Letters -- Fiction
 Vulgarity in popular culture -- Fiction

Price: $8.19

Summary:
Writing letters to the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., seventeen-year-old college-bound Justyce McAllister struggles to face the reality of race relations today and how they are shaping him.

Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: UG
   Reading Level: 4.80
   Points: 6.0   Quiz: 192070
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: 9-12
   Reading Level: 5.40
   Points: 11.0   Quiz: 72341



Full Text Reviews:

Booklist - 08/01/2017 *Starred Review* Perhaps a bright young man who is fourth in his graduating class, captain of the debate team, and on his way to an Ivy League school shouldn’t have too many worries. But Justyce McAllister’s grades have no influence on the police officer who handcuffs him while he’s trying to help his inebriated ex-girlfriend. The African American teen is shocked and angered when the officer is cleared of all charges, and so he turns to the written work of Martin Luther King Jr. for direction, inspiration, and therapy. He presents a simple question to the late civil rights leader: “What would you do, Martin?” After Justyce witnesses the fatal shooting of his best friend by an off-duty officer, and his name is negatively spread through the media, he begins to withdraw from friends and family, only finding solace in his teacher, new girlfriend, and his continued ruminative letter writing to Dr. King. Stone’s debut confronts the reality of police brutality, misconduct, and fatal shootings in the U.S., using an authentic voice to accurately portray the struggle of self-exploration teens like Justyce experience every day. Teens, librarians, and teachers alike will find this book a godsend in assisting discussions about dealing with police, as well as the philosophical underpinnings of King’s work. Vivid and powerful. - Copyright 2017 Booklist.

School Library Journal - 09/01/2017 Gr 9 Up—Justyce is an African American teen caught between two worlds. He knows that the education he's receiving at a private school will grant him more economic opportunities, however he begins to question the effects his private school education on his own identity. Some of his classmates believe that the racial pendulum has swung too far, giving African Americans an unfair advantage over their white counterparts. The kids he grew up with believe Justyce has assimilated too much and has forgotten where he came from. He questions his blackness, his relationship with his biracial girlfriend, and his attraction to his white debate partner Sarah Jane. Through a series of journal entries, Justyce attempts to figure out his place in the world by exploring the life of Dr. Martin Luther King. A violent altercation between a retired white police officer and his best friend causes Justyce to examine what it means to be an African American male in 2017. The length and pace of this well-written story make it a perfect read for reluctant and sophisticated readers alike. The main characters are well balanced and will resonate with teens. However, the voice of African American women is largely absent from the narrative. The characterization of Justyce's mother and his girlfriend are one-dimensional compared to some of the other protagonists. Still, this important work should be read alongside Jason Reynolds's and Brendan Kiely's All-American Boys and Kekla Magoon's How It Went Down. VERDICT An good choice for school and public libraries.—Desiree Thomas, Worthington Library, OH - Copyright 2017 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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