Bound To Stay Bound

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 Chasma Knights
 Author: Petty, Kate Reed

 Illustrator: Sun, Boya

 Publisher:  First Second
 Pub Year: 2018

 Dewey: 741.5
 Classification: Nonfiction
 Physical Description: 110 p., col. ill., 23 cm

 BTSB No: 865092 ISBN: 9781626726048
 Ages: 6-10 Grades: 1-5

 Subjects:
 Inventors -- Fiction
 Toys -- Fiction
 Knights and knighthood -- Fiction
 Fantasy fiction
 Graphic novels

Price: $20.51

Summary:
Beryl lives in a world full of toys. But these aren't your ordinary toys--they're mechanical marvels that almost seem alive! And at the slightest touch, these toys "catalyze," that is, they merge with their owner and give them special abilities. But not Beryl. She's a Neon Knight, and Neon Knights can't catalyze. Beryl does have a special ability that no one knows about--she's an inventor who can turn a broken toy into an amazing, new creation. When a powerful Oxygen Knight named Coro discovers Beryl's secret workshop, she wants in on the fun. But can a Neon Knight and an Oxygen Knight ever get along? In graphic novel format.

Accelerated Reader Information:
   Interest Level: LG
   Reading Level: 2.40
   Points: .5   Quiz: 195536
Reading Counts Information:
   Interest Level: 3-5
   Reading Level: 3.50
   Points: 3.0   Quiz: 73750

Reviews:
   School Library Journal (00/06/18)
   Booklist (05/15/18)

Full Text Reviews:

Booklist - 05/15/2018 In the world of Chasma, everyone’s life revolves around toys. Most Chasma knights are able to play with the toys by “catalyzing” them—essentially, switching them on and awakening their powers. Beryl is supersmart and resourceful, and her tinkering has gotten her the skills to be a bona fide toy maker; however, she happens to be a neon knight, and neon can’t catalyze with any toy. She forms an unlikely friendship with Coro, an oxygen knight (the most powerful kind there is) and shows everyone that being different isn’t so bad, after all. Petty and Sun’s warm, breezy story in bubbly artwork features a predicament lots of kids can relate to, namely, mania over the latest toy. Beryl’s interest in fixing things is unfashionable, but gradually, everyone comes to value her capabilities. The pastel palette, rounded figures, and cute toys aplenty are all very appealing, and the gentle emphasis on STEM is a nice bonus. A closing spread inviting readers to design their own Chasma knights encourages them to stretch their creative muscles. - Copyright 2018 Booklist.

School Library Journal - 06/01/2018 Gr 2–5—In the world of Chasma, Knights can make their toys grow or dance. Toys can even be catalyzed so that they can merge with their owners to give them special powers. Neon Knights, however, are the only ones who can't catalyze toys. Beryl, a lonely Neon Knight, makes toys that can grow and move on their own. She meets Coro, an outgoing Oxygen Knight (one of the most powerful kinds of Knights), and the two become fast friends. Beryl shows Coro her new toys, but she has one rule: these toys cannot be catalyzed, or else they'll go haywire! Coro disregards Beryl's admonition, while Beryl tries to create a toy with a powerful golden core. When both events go sideways, Coro and Beryl must work together to save the day. This graphic novel features a bright palette, anime-esque character designs reminiscent of Steven Universe, and seamless, flowing panel work. The book uses brief conversations and concise narration from Beryl to tell a simple tale that still touches on deep themes, such as bullying, social exclusion, and friendship. Readers are told only that Neon Knights cannot catalyze toys; they aren't given any information on the setting or what these powers entail before being thrown into the story. As such, some might be lost amid the dreamlike scenery, ornate outfits, and quick-moving narrative. VERDICT A gorgeous work; for most children's graphic novel collections.—Matisse Mozer, Los Angeles Public Library - Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and/or School Library Journal used with permission.

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